Jo Ingles

Journalist/Producer

Contact Jo Ingles at jingles@statehousenews.org.

Jo Ingles covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio's public radio stations. In addition, she's a regular guest on WOSU-TV's "Columbus on the Record" and WBNS-TV's "Face the State." Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondents Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondents Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

Ways to Connect

Aleksei Pavloff

One of the three Democrats who won statewide in Ohio last week, U. S. Senator Sherrod Brown, says he’s thinking about his next step - maybe running for president.  

Dan Konik

The newly opened National Veterans Memorial and Museum in Columbus is open this weekend to celebrate Veteran’s Day. 

Jo Ingles

Leaders of the Ohio Legislature say it’s time to look at changing the methods citizens groups are using to try to change the state’s constitution. 

Karen Kasler

The Republican leader of the Ohio Senate says while he and many others didn’t support Issue 1, the criminal sentencing and drug treatment reform plan that failed Tuesday. But he suggests there is a will to make the issue a top priority in the newly elected Senate next year. 

Jo Ingles

This week’s election underscored some weaknesses for Ohio Democrats. The party’s candidates lost all of the statewide executive offices and gained seats but also lost some in the state House and Senate. This has left many wondering where Democrats in Ohio go from here. 

Dan Konik

Ohio Republicans swept the statewide office races in yesterday’s election -- carried by a big victory from Mike DeWine who beat Democrat Rich Cordray for the governor’s office. While the Democrats did have some major wins, the Republicans said the night belonged to them. 

Dan Konik

A judge has granted a temporary restraining order that allows Ohioans who are in a Dayton jail to cast ballots in this election. 

Karen Kasler

Voters in southwest Ohio’s Butler County who returned ballots in envelopes that didn’t have the correct information on them will get their votes counted anyway. 

Jo Ingles

There’s a law that’s been on the books that designates part of Election Day as a state holiday but one Democratic state lawmaker says it’s not being followed.  

Ohio Debate Commission Debate
David Petkiewicz, Cleveland.com

Four years ago, there were no debates in the governor's race. This year, the major party candidates were together, on stage, answering questions at least three different times in debates sponsored by different groups and media outlets. But that wasn’t the case for some local races where candidates for local and Statehouse seats refused to debate. 

Ohio Statehouse
Jo Ingles

Twenty abortion restrictions have been put in place during the Kasich administration. Ohio now has some of the strictest abortion laws in the nation. And the U.S. Supreme Court, with the addition of Justice Brett Kavanaugh, is now thought by many to be conservative enough to overturn the landmark Roe -vs- Wade decision that allowed legal abortion. So, what’s at stake in this election for those who support or oppose abortion? 

Jo ingles

As the campaigns for statewide offices, the Ohio legislature, US Congress and the US Senate come into the final weekend before election day, candidates are getting a little help from their out of state friends. 

Ohio Department of Highway Safety

Two lawsuits have been filed against the state over the way it issues drivers’ licenses to legal refugees or children of undocumented Ohioans. 

CaseJustin, Shutterstock.com

A leading organization representing Jewish Americans says the mass shooting at a Pittsburgh area synagogue over the weekend has left Ohioans who practice the faith in state of shock. It has prompted synagogues to step up safety.

Jo Ingles

Abortion opponents have asked the Ohio Department of Health to consider taking action against Toledo’s only abortion clinic. 

Franklin County Board of Elections
Jo Ingles

Nearly a quarter of all Ohio adults have some type of disability. Voting can be a difficult process for some of them. But there are things that are being done to make it easier for Ohioans with disabilities to cast ballots.

Jo Ingles

Republican Ohio Governor John Kasich is skeptical about the extent of the blue wave some political pundits have projected this November. 

July 2018
Jo Ingles

Gov. John Kasich says it’s not right for immigrants to be blamed for taking jobs away from Ohioans. 

Former Director of Agriculture
Statehouse News Bureau

Gov. John Kasich is speaking out about why he fired the former director of the Ohio Department of Agriculture last week. 

Twitter

Ohio’s Medicaid Department says a report by the federal inspector general that says the agency paid for medical care for dead people is wrong.

Gubernatorial candidates
Dan Konik

Since President Trump took office, thousands of Ohio women have taken to the White House and the Statehouse, advocating for abortion rights, equal pay and lambasting what they see as misogyny in government policies. The slogan “Remember in November” became one of their rallying cries. But will they? In a continuing series the Statehouse News Bureau breaks down how the two major party candidates for governor stack up when it comes to key issues, This report is on what Ohio’s candidates are doing to win women's votes.

Xenia
Jo Ingles

An Ohio pastor who was speaking out in support of Issue 1, the state ballot issue that would provide drug users and possessors with treatment instead of jail time, says he’s changing his mind. 

GTS/Shutterstock.com

The state budget office is saying that if Issue 1 passes this fall, it will cost local communities more money for a variety of reasons. That’s a main reason why the issue, which is intended to divert money from incarceration into treatment in many cases, has drawn opposition from groups representing cities and counties. 

Statehouse News Bureau

Several large and small cultivators of marijuana for Ohio’s Medical Marijuana Program say they plan to be harvesting their products soon. But that doesn’t mean patients will be able to buy it anytime soon.

Dan Konik

Groups that are registering voters to cast ballots in November are scurrying throughout Ohio on this final day to register for the 2018 election. One of those groups has been reaching out to possible voters in unusual ways.

Jo Ingles

Last year, Ohio changed its rules for prescribing opioids, restricting amounts of, and circumstances under which, doctors can prescribe those narcotics. The new rules have an exemption for people who are in hospice type care for diseases like cancer. But many patients who suffer from chronic pain say the new rules are leaving them without pain relief, resulting in unintended consequences.

Karen Kasler

Voter registrations are up in Ohio since November 2016. And that pleases a non-partisan group that encourages increased voter participation. 

Jo Ingles

The controversy over conservative federal judge Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to a lifetime position on the U.S. Supreme Court has left many people wondering how the perceived shift in that bench will affect them. LGBTQ Ohioans are concerned.

Jo Ingles

Backers of gender equality legislation that’s been proposed again in Ohio say they are making slow headway in getting the civil rights protection they think the bill would afford them. 

Jo Ingles

The Human Rights Campaign estimates there are 1.8 million LGBTQ Ohioans and their allies. And there’s an effort to get those voters to the polls next month, with key statewide races and Ohio’s Congressional delegation on the ballot.

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