Coronavirus - education

Karen Kasler

As many Ohio kids go back to in-person classes, Gov. Mike DeWine says it’s important for Ohio’s students, parents and communities know about coronavirus spread. So, he’s signed an order to require better reporting in schools starting next Tuesday. 

Mike DeWine August 11, 2020
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

The state is requiring every school district in Ohio to come up with a reporting system to notify the community and health officials about COVID-19 cases in the classroom. Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) says this is another resource to help school stay open for in-person learning.

Andy Chow

A group of pediatricians joined Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) in raising awareness of how communities can help students return to school. Amid concerns over the risk of coronavirus spreading at schools, the doctors say there are ways students can stay safe.

Distance learning, books, laptop
Aksonsat Uanthoeng/Shutterstock

The state is now accepting applications for schools seeking funds to expand broadband accessibility. That program has lifted a restriction that supporters say will go even further in helping low-income districts.

Gov. Mike DeWine holds up a baggie with homemade masks at a press conference in April. He encouraged people to start wearing masks then, but they weren't required until a statewide order in July.
OGT/The Ohio Channel

COVID-19 cases and deaths inched up in Ohio after three days of declines. And Gov. Mike DeWine has new instructions to prevent community spread in the next few weeks for kids going to back to class, because he says that will determine when school can return to a regular schedule.

Karen Kasler

With protests shining a light on deeply rooted racial inequities, school leaders are being asked to be on the lookout for racial trauma when students return to class.

Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

The Ohio Department of Education is unveiling statewide guidelines for how schools can reopen in the fall during the coronavirus pandemic with Gov. Mike DeWine saying the plan has the goal of bringing kids back to the classroom.

Licking Heights High School in August 2019.
Dan Konik

The state’s more than 600 school districts are waiting for the Ohio Department of Education to release its COVID-19 guidance on how to operate in the new school year. But with the first day of classes less than two months away, many districts are making their own plans as they wait.

School bus
Dan Konik

School districts around the state are preparing for what the next academic year will look like for students, teachers, and staff. But administrators say they're waiting for the state to give them guidelines before they can put those plans into action.

Andy Chow

Most schools say they plan to restart learning in two months but a coalition of school administrators and teachers from the state's largest city school districts say they're waiting on a slew of decisions from Gov. Mike DeWine and the Ohio Department of Education ranging from funding to operations.