Education

Andy Chow/ESB Professional (Shutterstock)

Education is a major issue in the race to become Ohio’s next governor. Both Republican Mike DeWine and Democrat Rich Cordray say students take too many tests, but the candidates diverge on how they plan to reduce testing and support schools. 

Andy Chow

Two more Ohio school districts want to join in the court case against the now closed online charter school, ECOT. The districts say they don’t trust Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine to fight for their best interests. 

Shutterstock.com

Schools throughout Ohio are finding out whether they are making the grade on the state’s annual school report cards. 

Dan Konik

A lawmaker wants to stop companies and organizations from using taxpayer money to fund non-disclosure agreements. The issue came up recently with the now-closed online charter school, ECOT, which required severance packages to include these agreements. 

The Ohio Channel

The Ohio Supreme Court has likely dealt the final blow to what was the state’s largest online charter school, ruling the state could base funding for the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow on student participation, not enrollment. 

Karen Kasler

The Ohio Attorney General has filed an argument in court claiming ECOT’s agreements with its management and software service companies constitute a pattern of corrupt activity. The claim echoes complaints Democratic lawmakers have lodged for years. 

Karen Kasler

The new Speaker of the Ohio House is citing a two-year-old study from a pro-charter school group slamming the performance of virtual charter schools. And there may be changes coming in the laws that govern those online schools following the ECOT scandal.

Karen Kasler

The controversial proposal to merge K-12, higher education and workforce development into one big cabinet level state agency won’t go forward any time soon. The plan was backed by some Republican lawmakers and Gov. John Kasich, but had lots of opposition.

Andy Chow

A coalition of public universities is touting a study that says income from schools, their students and alumni adds up to $42 billion pumped into the state’s economy. 

Karen Kasler

A progressive think tank says data from the Ohio Department of Education’s website shows not only how much state money went to the now-closed Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, but also how much traditional public school districts lost to what was the state’s largest online charter school.

Karen Kasler

Republican candidates on this fall’s ballot are moving to distance themselves from the founder of what was the state’s largest online charter schoo, following a state audit that could result in criminal charges and reports of an FBI investigation for illegal campaign contributions.

Andy Chow

The state auditor says the state’s largest online charter school committed fraud by inflating student participation numbers in order to continue collecting millions in taxpayer money. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, the auditor is now turning over his findings about the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow for possible criminal investigation.

Andy Chow

Longtime critics of the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, the now-closed but still controversial online charter school, say that more employees would come forward with accusations of student data manipulation had they not signed contracts with non-disclosure agreements attached. 

simez78/Shutterstock

A new proposal would completely change the current state report card system as we know it. The bill would back off of the “A” through “F” grading scheme and offer a more comprehensive view.

Karen Kasler

Though it’s been closed for more than four months, critics are now accusing what was the state’s largest online charter school of deliberately manipulating student data to defraud the state out of millions of dollars. The allegation against the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is coming from a former employee. That allegation is now part of a larger investigation. 

Facebook

School districts around the state were forced to change their standardized testing schedules because of a system malfunction. Ohio’s testing vendor, AIR, told the state that students were not able to log-in and access their tests. One lawmaker says this is an example of a bigger issue he’s concerned about.

Andy Chow

A House panel listened to hours of testimony against a plan that would overhaul the state’s education system. The proposal would consolidate departments into one large education agency which answers directly to the governor. Many of the people lined up to speak against the bill are parents who homeschool their kids.

Dan Konik

House Republicans are defending the proposal that would merge several departments into one large education agency which would report directly to the governor. Elected local school boards are sounding off on how it would change the state board of education.

Andy Chow

The Statehouse was packed with people to testify against a proposed overhaul to the education system. The plan would hand the reins of the education department over to the governor. The latest committee hearing attracted opponents from several angles.

Andy Chow

The bill to overhaul the state’s education system and hand more control over to the governor’s office is getting its first committee hearing. Opponents say this measure strips away local control and one senator sees similarities to another controversial bill from a few years ago.

Karen Kasler

Lawmakers are pushing a bill that would overhaul the state education system in order to give most of the control over to the governor’s office. This is something Gov. John Kasich has wanted for a while now.

Karen Kasler

House Republicans rolled out a plan that would overhaul the state’s education system by consolidating several departments into one umbrella organization – including the Ohio Department of Education and of Higher Education. Supporters say this will bolster the connection between education and career-readiness.

The Ohio Channel

It was the heavyweight court battle that’s been brewing for more than a year. Attorneys for the now-closed Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow and the Ohio Department of Education traded jabs before the Ohio Supreme Court over how the state should fund schools and if that funding should be tied to just enrollment or student participation. 

Dan Konik

The Ohio Supreme Court will hear both sides of the high-profile argument between the state education department and the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow on Tuesday. ECOT, which was the state’s largest online charter school before it closed, claims the state wrongfully clawed back millions of dollars it was paid to educate students. But the state says ECOT did not verify student participation. A former staff member is claiming teachers and students have become the victims of the ECOT fallout.

Karen Kasler

The shutdown of the state’s largest online charter school – which owes tens of millions of dollars to the state – has thousands of students searching for options in the middle of the school year. And there are also some 800 teachers and faculty from the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow who are now looking for work.

Andy Chow

An estimated 12,000 students must figure out where to go now that the state’s largest online charter school has closed. Marred by budget problems and alleged failure to comply with regulations, ECOT’s sponsor decided to back out. And the sponsor and the school met in a Franklin County courtroom to figure out what happens to the school’s funds and records. 

Karen Kasler

The state’s largest online charter school could be in danger of closing in the near future with the news that the school is losing its sponsor. This is just the latest domino to fall for the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, which has been battling financial and regulatory issues for years now. 

Karen Kasler

A final end to the legal battle involving the state and its largest online charter school is coming closer. The Ohio Supreme Court has set a date to hear arguments in the case filed by the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow.

simez78/SHUTTERSTOCK

The state is approaching a new era in school report cards as districts will receive an overall letter grade next year. A research group wants Ohio to change their formula before those new grades come out.

Karen Kasler

This time last year state school board members saw an alarming report that showed about a 1/3 of Ohio’s high school juniors were not meeting the standards needed to graduate. That was for the class of 2018 and the numbers aren’t looking much better for the class of 2019.

Pages