Education

Karen Kasler

An Ohio Senate committee has approved "alternate pathways" to graduation for high school seniors and juniors who are not on track to earn their diploma through the current method of using standardized test scores. 

Karen Kasler

High school seniors not meeting the testing benchmarks to graduate next year could have extra options on the table, such as good attendance and GPA. That is if Ohio lawmakers can pass a change before the end of the year. 

Andy Chow

Democrats state lawmakers are using these last few weeks of session to try and eliminate school district takeovers by the state. This process has allowed the state to assign a CEO to take control of an academically failing district. 

Tim Dubravetz

For the second year in a row, Ohio lawmakers are considering delaying tougher new requirements for a high school diploma because thousands of students are in danger of not being able to graduate.  Gov. John Kasich said he's concerned about the looming graduation crisis and education in general.

Andy Chow

A review of the way Ohio’s education department handled a charter school data-scrubbing scandal was unable to determine if there was “malicious” intent involved. But the audit does say that the department was poorly run with a lack of control. 

Karen Kasler

Superintendents are calling on lawmakers to help the state avoid a possible high school graduation crisis -- again. They say, without state intervention, as many as a third of students will not meet the requirements to graduate. 

Karen Kasler

The state school board has approved several graduation options for high school students in the class of 2022 and beyond. But board members say lawmakers need to act on some alternatives for the thousands of students who might not graduate this coming spring.

Andy Chow/ESB Professional (Shutterstock)

Education is a major issue in the race to become Ohio’s next governor. Both Republican Mike DeWine and Democrat Rich Cordray say students take too many tests, but the candidates diverge on how they plan to reduce testing and support schools. 

Andy Chow

Two more Ohio school districts want to join in the court case against the now closed online charter school, ECOT. The districts say they don’t trust Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine to fight for their best interests. 

Shutterstock.com

Schools throughout Ohio are finding out whether they are making the grade on the state’s annual school report cards. 

Dan Konik

A lawmaker wants to stop companies and organizations from using taxpayer money to fund non-disclosure agreements. The issue came up recently with the now-closed online charter school, ECOT, which required severance packages to include these agreements. 

The Ohio Channel

The Ohio Supreme Court has likely dealt the final blow to what was the state’s largest online charter school, ruling the state could base funding for the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow on student participation, not enrollment. 

Karen Kasler

The Ohio Attorney General has filed an argument in court claiming ECOT’s agreements with its management and software service companies constitute a pattern of corrupt activity. The claim echoes complaints Democratic lawmakers have lodged for years. 

Karen Kasler

The new Speaker of the Ohio House is citing a two-year-old study from a pro-charter school group slamming the performance of virtual charter schools. And there may be changes coming in the laws that govern those online schools following the ECOT scandal.

Karen Kasler

The controversial proposal to merge K-12, higher education and workforce development into one big cabinet level state agency won’t go forward any time soon. The plan was backed by some Republican lawmakers and Gov. John Kasich, but had lots of opposition.

Andy Chow

A coalition of public universities is touting a study that says income from schools, their students and alumni adds up to $42 billion pumped into the state’s economy. 

Karen Kasler

A progressive think tank says data from the Ohio Department of Education’s website shows not only how much state money went to the now-closed Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, but also how much traditional public school districts lost to what was the state’s largest online charter school.

Karen Kasler

Republican candidates on this fall’s ballot are moving to distance themselves from the founder of what was the state’s largest online charter schoo, following a state audit that could result in criminal charges and reports of an FBI investigation for illegal campaign contributions.

Andy Chow

The state auditor says the state’s largest online charter school committed fraud by inflating student participation numbers in order to continue collecting millions in taxpayer money. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, the auditor is now turning over his findings about the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow for possible criminal investigation.

Andy Chow

Longtime critics of the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, the now-closed but still controversial online charter school, say that more employees would come forward with accusations of student data manipulation had they not signed contracts with non-disclosure agreements attached. 

simez78/Shutterstock

A new proposal would completely change the current state report card system as we know it. The bill would back off of the “A” through “F” grading scheme and offer a more comprehensive view.

Karen Kasler

Though it’s been closed for more than four months, critics are now accusing what was the state’s largest online charter school of deliberately manipulating student data to defraud the state out of millions of dollars. The allegation against the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is coming from a former employee. That allegation is now part of a larger investigation. 

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School districts around the state were forced to change their standardized testing schedules because of a system malfunction. Ohio’s testing vendor, AIR, told the state that students were not able to log-in and access their tests. One lawmaker says this is an example of a bigger issue he’s concerned about.

Andy Chow

A House panel listened to hours of testimony against a plan that would overhaul the state’s education system. The proposal would consolidate departments into one large education agency which answers directly to the governor. Many of the people lined up to speak against the bill are parents who homeschool their kids.

Dan Konik

House Republicans are defending the proposal that would merge several departments into one large education agency which would report directly to the governor. Elected local school boards are sounding off on how it would change the state board of education.

Andy Chow

The Statehouse was packed with people to testify against a proposed overhaul to the education system. The plan would hand the reins of the education department over to the governor. The latest committee hearing attracted opponents from several angles.

Andy Chow

The bill to overhaul the state’s education system and hand more control over to the governor’s office is getting its first committee hearing. Opponents say this measure strips away local control and one senator sees similarities to another controversial bill from a few years ago.

Karen Kasler

Lawmakers are pushing a bill that would overhaul the state education system in order to give most of the control over to the governor’s office. This is something Gov. John Kasich has wanted for a while now.

Karen Kasler

House Republicans rolled out a plan that would overhaul the state’s education system by consolidating several departments into one umbrella organization – including the Ohio Department of Education and of Higher Education. Supporters say this will bolster the connection between education and career-readiness.

The Ohio Channel

It was the heavyweight court battle that’s been brewing for more than a year. Attorneys for the now-closed Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow and the Ohio Department of Education traded jabs before the Ohio Supreme Court over how the state should fund schools and if that funding should be tied to just enrollment or student participation. 

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