gas tax

2019 brought new leadership in the governor’s office and in the Ohio House. But though Republicans were still in charge in both those places and in the Senate, there were only 21 bills that were signed into law, including four required budgets.

Dan Konik

21 bills were signed into law in Ohio in 2019, including the new $69-billion two-year budget, a controversial energy bill that reduced or eliminated clean energy standards and an abortion bill that was put on hold by a federal court before it could take effect.

Daniel Konik

As of November 1, Ohio’s 10.5 cent gas tax increase from the state’s transportation budget has been in place for four months.

maridav,shutterstock.com

Ohioans have just a couple of days to fill up before the new statewide gas tax goes into effect. 

Gov. Mike DeWine at a press conference on the roof of a parking garage, overlooking the Columbus Crossroads project at the I-70/I-71 corridor.
Karen Kasler

Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled plans for the next phase of construction on the busy and complicated confluence of two freeways in downtown Columbus. He says the recently approved gas tax increase will make projects like this possible – at least for a little while.

5m3photos, Shutterstock.com

Beginning July 1st, Ohio’s gas tax will increase by ten and a half cents per gallon for regular fuel. But the tax on diesel will go up by 19 cents, because big trucks do most of the damage on Ohio’s roads. It's that diesel fuel increase that some business leaders say will end up costing all Ohioans more in the long run.

Dan Konik

Members of the Ohio House and Senate reached a deal to raise the gas tax by 10.5 cents beginning in July. The lawmakers say that will be enough to help Ohio close a funding gap for construction on the state's roads and bridges. 

Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina, left) stands alongside Gov. Mike DeWine during DeWine's first State of the State speech in March. House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) is on DeWine's right.
Statehouse News Bureau

The deadline for a new state transportation budget with a gas tax hike came and went at midnight – without a new spending plan being signed. Lawmakers are coming back to the Statehouse this week hoping to work it out.

Sen. Kenny Yuko (D-Cleveland)
The State of Ohio, Ohio Public TV

It’s looking more unlikely that Ohio lawmakers will decide on the size of a proposed gas tax in time to meet the Sunday deadline to have the transportation budget signed into law. 

Dan Konik

The clock is ticking as Ohio lawmakers only have until Sunday to pass a transportation budget, but they’re jammed in a stalemate over the gas tax increase. 

Nexus 7, Shutterstock.com

Ohio lawmakers haven’t been able to come to an agreement over how much to raise the state’s gas tax. The committee of House and Senate lawmakers will meet again Friday morning, trying to come up with a workable plan. And they need to do that soon.

Dan Konik, Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio lawmakers continue to work behind closed doors on hammering out an agreement over how much to increase Ohio’s gas tax. 

As lawmakers are working out differences in their transportation budgets, there’s one thing in the Senate’s version that doesn’t seem to have anything to do with transportation – a change in a tax credit designed for low-income people. But it’s being tied to the increase in the gas tax.

Gov. Mike DeWine (center) holds up a report on dangerous intersections. Joining him are ODOT Director Jack Marchbanks, Ohio State Highway Patrol Lt. Col. Kevin Teaford and Lt. Col. Marla Gaskill and Department of Public Safety Director Tom Stickrath.
Karen Kasler

Gov. Mike DeWine is trying a last ditch effort to push lawmakers back toward the gas tax increase that he originally proposed – which they slashed dramatically. 

Andy Chow

The Republican Senate president is saying the competing transportation budget proposals are closer than they appear as lawmakers go into the final week of negotiations before the deadline to pass a new budget.

Roschetzky Photography

The Ohio Senate has approved changes to the transportation budget, taking the originally-proposed gas tax hike from 18-cents a gallon to 6-cents a gallon. 

Andy Chow

Gov. Mike DeWine says he's trying to convey his message to lawmakers that the state is in dire need of more money for construction projects, and that his 18-cent gas tax increase proposal is the way to generate those funds. But the House cut that proposal down to 10.7 cents and Republican Senate leaders say more changes are coming.

Andy Chow

Republican Senate leaders released their version of the transportation budget bill, making dozens of changes to what the House passed in HB62, however the gas tax increase went untouched. Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon) says it's very likely that will change.

Dan Konik

Republican leaders in the Ohio Senate have hinted at some possible changes to the transportation budget plan that could spark a debate among the Senate, House, and governor's office.

Daniel Konik

Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18 cents gas tax increase was dropped to 10.7 cents by the House. Now the transportation budget is in the Senate, where it’s likely to get changed again.

Maridav, Shutterstock.com

When asked by reporters whether it's time for the federal government to hike taxes on gas, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine explains why he thinks that's not a good idea.

An RTA bus crosses the Detroit-Superior Bridge in downtown Cleveland in 2013.
Cleveland RTA/Facebook

Mass transit advocates in Ohio got a huge surprise in the House version of the transportation budget – funding for public transportation soared by 150% over Gov. Mike DeWine’s original proposal.  And they're hoping the Senate will go along with that too.

Karen Kasler

There are some big changes in the transportation budget passed by the House compared to the proposal from Gov. Mike DeWine, who has said an 18 cent gas tax hike is needed to maintain and repair Ohio’s roads.

ODOT Director Jack Marchbanks testified to the House Finance Committee last month.
Andy Chow

The director of the Ohio Department of Transportation isn’t pleased with the decision by the House Finance Committee to cut Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18 cent gas tax increase down to just under 11 cents. But he’s holding out hope, even though that plan is likely to be on the House floor Thursday.

ODOT Director Jack Marchbanks testified about the gas tax increase before the House Finance Committee last month.
Andy Chow

Just hours after Gov. Mike DeWine’s State of the State speech in which he argued for an 18-cent gas tax increase to fund road repair and maintenance, state lawmakers cut his request dramatically.

Kalitha Williams from Policy Matters Ohio, Rep. Michael Skindell (D-Lakewood), Minority Leader Emilia Sykes (D-Akron) and Rep. Erica Crawley (D-Columbus) talk about the plan to make the earned income tax credit or EITC non refundable.
Karen Kasler

With debate over increasing the gas tax and adding another income tax cut in the next budget, Democratic lawmakers and anti-poverty advocates are trying again what they've pushed for years - changes to a tax credit aimed at low-income working Ohioans.

Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) spoke to a gathering of the County Commissioners' Association of Ohio in December 2018.
Karen Kasler

Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18-cent hike in the gas tax is still before state lawmakers. They would have to approve it as part of the transportation budget, which must be signed into law by March 31.

Democrat Richard Cordray (left) and Republican Mike DeWine shake hands before the final gubernatorial debate, sponsored by the Ohio Debate Commission.
David Petkiewicz, Cleveland.com

Republican Gov. Mike DeWine has found himself in a tough position right at the start of his administration – having to raise a tax that hits most Ohioans. And Democrats have pounced on him for it.

Andy Chow

Gov. Mike DeWine says raising the gas tax from 28-cents a gallon to 46-cents a gallon will help fill a $1 billion construction budget shortfall, but the proposal has led to a debate over how it will impact Ohioans.

Gov. Mike DeWine
Statehouse News Bureau

In his campaign for governor last year, Republican Mike DeWine accused his Democratic opponent Richard Cordray of planning to raise taxes. And now, within weeks of taking office, Gov. DeWine is proposing an 18 cent hike in Ohio’s gas tax to pay for road maintenance and construction. 

Pages