vouchers

Karen Kasler

The legislation making changes across a variety of state policies because of coronavirus also settled an issue that lawmakers had been struggling with for months. That’s the question of how many students would qualify next school year for the state’s largest private school voucher program.

Laura Jones, who chairs the citizens committee that works to pass levies in the Hudson City Schools, hands a bagged lunch to Rep. Don Jones (R-Freeport), who chairs the conference committee hearing the changes to EdChoice.
Karen Kasler

Lawmakers and school leaders would normally have Presidents Day off, but instead they spent it at the Statehouse, as testimony on changes to the EdChoice private school voucher program went on. Most of the witnesses were firmly in one of two camps – public schools or parochial schools.

Saddia Kendrick, an eighth grader at Corryville Catholic in Cincinnati. She wants to attend a private Catholic high school, but said if EdChoice is eliminated her family wouldn’t get a $6,000 voucher and they would have to pay tuition.
Karen Kasler

As conference committee hearings on a bill to change the state’s EdChoice private school voucher program go on, parents and students in that program came together to speak out for one of the two plans being debated by lawmakers. A resolution needs to be agreed on before the EdChoice application process opens April 1.

Karen Kasler

There’s now a dual front in the battle over what to do with the state’s private school voucher program – two conference committees dealing with two versions of vouchers. A resolution needs to happen before April 1, when the process to apply for those vouchers opens up after lawmakers delayed it.

Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) and House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford)
Karen Kasler

With just hours to go before families could submit applications for the state’s EdChoice private school voucher program on February 1, lawmakers delayed that window till April 1 till they could work out a compromise. And those chambers’ Republican leaders are holding fast to their different proposals.

Gov. Mike DeWine at Facebook, New Albany
Jo Ingles

Gov. Mike DeWine says he knows the House and Senate have different ideas about how to deal with changing the state’s Ed Choice school voucher program. He says he’s not taking sides on that. But DeWine says it’s important to think about why that program exists in the first place.

Karen Kasler

The House has voted on a plan to move the start of Ohio's private school voucher application process ahead to April 1, just hours before the EdChoice program is supposed to start accepting applications on Saturday. It now has to go to the Senate this morning, and a statement suggests the vote there may run into problems.

Daniel Konik

Talks on a deal to stop a huge increase in the number of Ohio public school buildings where students would qualify for private school vouchers are dragging on. And the House Speaker is proposing a major overhaul of the voucher system.

Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) speaks to reporters after House session, while waiting for the Senate to take action on a bill that includes a change to the EdChoice voucher program.
Karen Kasler

Republican leaders in the Senate have approved a deal that would stop a dramatic increase in the number of public school buildings where students will be eligible for private school vouchers starting this weekend.

Karen Kasler

State lawmakers are expected to vote on a compromise that could stop a huge increase in the number of Ohio public school buildings where students will be eligible for private school vouchers starting this weekend. If a change is made, it has to happen before the EdChoice voucher program starts accepting applications on Saturday.

Crystal Brown, left, comforts her 15 year old daughter Josephine Brown-Walker as she talks about her EdChoice voucher, which allows her to attend a Christian high school in Columbus.
Karen Kasler

Lawmakers who’ve wanted to stop the impending explosion in the number of school buildings where students will be eligible for the state’s largest private school voucher program say there’s a deal in the works. But parents and students already in the EdChoice program want it to stay and expand.

A group of students in an elementary school classroom in Westerville.
Karen Kasler

The number of public school buildings where students will be eligible for the state’s largest private school voucher program will more than double in the coming school year. And that could blow huge holes in the budgets of 70 percent of Ohio’s school districts. Lawmakers who have said they want to change that are running out of time.

Desks and chairs in an elementary school classroom
Karen Kasler

A lawmaker who backed the expansion of the state’s largest voucher program says it’s creating problems – with a 400 percent increase in the number of public school buildings where students will be eligible for private school vouchers by next school year. 

A hallway in Westerville South High School, one of the schools on the list of buildings where students are eligible for EdChoice vouchers starting in the 2020-21 school year.
Karen Kasler

A Democratic lawmakers and longtime critic of private school vouchers says she’s not convinced there’s time to do a short-term fix to a huge expansion of the state’s largest voucher program.

Karen Kasler

New rules on the state’s largest voucher program have meant a 400 percent increase in the number of public schools where students qualify for private school vouchers. 

A hallway is decorated with classroom projects at a public elementary school in Westerville.
Karen Kasler

Ohio’s public schools could lose millions of dollars to private schools through an expansion of the state’s biggest voucher program.

Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford)
Karen Kasler

The Speaker of the House isn’t pleased that the Senate has diverted some money his chamber had put toward services for lower-income students into other educational priorities.

Karen Kasler

Republican Senate leaders have frozen the existing school funding formula in their version of the budget.  So did the House, but it did add funding into services to help lower-income students.  Senators are planning to make some changes there.