Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Government/Politics

Brown and Portman call for accountability on anniversary of insurrection

Supporters of now-former President Trump rioted and breached the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, as Congress was certifying President-elect Joe Biden's 2020 election win.
lev radin
/
shutterstock.com
Supporters of now-former President Trump rioted and breached the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, as Congress was certifying President-elect Joe Biden's 2020 election win.

U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and U.S. Senator Rob Portman (R-Ohio) both share thoughts on the anniversary of the January 6, 2021 insurrection but with different approaches.

As Americans observe the anniversary of the insurrection by supporters of former President Donald Trump, Ohio's two U.S. Senators are calling for accountability.

Brown says there are elected officials who continue to carry out the lie about a rigged election that sparked the insurrection.

Brown says he's concerned about the Republican elected officials who continue the false narrative that the election was "stolen" from former President Trump.

"A number of people that actually did real damage and assaulted police officers, attacked others. Some of them are going to prison for a little while. But the people behind this haven't been accountable," says Brown.

Without calling it an insurrection or mentioning former President Trump, Portman issued a written statement through Twitter, saying the attack on the U.S. Capitol remains a "stain on our nation's history."

"Anyone who breached the U.S. Capitol and took part in illegal activities that day should be held accountable, as should any violent protesters who break the law," Portman stated.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) says his comments last year that Trump fueled the fire of the insurrection haven't changed. But he added that the country is strong and what binds Americans is much stronger than political or ideological differences.

"This is a strong country. What binds us together is so much bigger than the differences, political differences, the ideological differences that we might have," says DeWine.

Community leaders in Ohio have coordinated with groups around the country to hold a candlelight vigil to observe the anniversary of the attack on the U.S. Capitol building. The message from the groups states, "In America, the voters decide the outcome of elections."

Related Content