Abortion

Abortion rights protestors at Ohio Statehouse
Jo Ingles

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled a Louisiana law that requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital is an undue burden and unconstitutional. But abortion rights activists say the ruling doesn’t affect a similar law in Ohio.

Elvira Koneva, Shutterstock.com

A panel of three federal court judges won’t get involved in a dispute over abortion and the state’s coronavirus order regarding elective surgery – which keeps facilities that perform abortions open for now. 

Ohio Attorney General David Yost
Jo Ingles

Earlier this week, a federal judge temporarily ruled Ohio cannot force abortion clinics to close under the coronavirus order banning elective, non-essential surgery. Now,  the state is considering its next move.

Fabrika Simf, Shutterstock.com

A federal judge has temporarily blocked the state from using the coronavirus order that bans elective, non-essential surgeries to stop the six clinics in Ohio that offer surgical abortions from performing those procedures.

Statehouse News Bureau

The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio, Planned Parenthood Federation of America and some Ohio attorneys have filed an emergency lawsuit against the state.

Legal abortion supporters and opponents
Jo Ingles

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost is ordering abortion clinics to stop all non-essential procedures. Those facilities are fighting back, saying their services are essential.

Agenturfotografin, Shutterstock.com

Patients, especially those in rural areas who find it difficult to access a doctor in person, can often access doctors through two-way conferences via computers. The Ohio Senate has passed a bill that bans doctors from using telemedicine to prescribe abortion inducing drugs. 

Agenturfotografin

A bill to prevent doctors from using telemedicine to provide abortion-inducing drugs has been introduced. But backers of the bill don't know of any cases where that is happening in Ohio right now.

Supporters of legal abortion at Ohio Statehouse
Sam Aberle

A Cincinnati abortion clinic that recently lost the variance it needs to operate thinks the problem is now resolved. 

Abortion supporters and opponents
Jo Ingles

Cincinnati’s only abortion clinic is in business now but its future is uncertain. It is fighting to keep its doors open. 

U.S. Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) spoke at an Ohio Right to Life rally at the Statehouse in January 2016.
Karen Kasler

Ohio’s Republican U.S. Senator and most of its Republican Congressional delegation have signed onto a court document that could lead to the overturning of a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling legalizing abortion.

Dan Konik

Abortion was a big issue in Ohio in 2019, as it has been for several years.  A strict abortion ban was one of the 21 bills that passed, and more bills are still under consideration. 

Gov. Mike DeWine (center), surrounded by anti-abortion activists and Lt. Gov. Jon Husted (right), talks to reporters after signing the "Heartbeat Bill" six-week abortion ban in April 2019.
Karen Kasler

One of the first big pieces of legislation Gov. Mike DeWine signed was an abortion ban. But he said it’s only part of an overall agenda he’s pushing.

Rep. Stephanie Howse (D-Cleveland)
Jo Ingles

An Ohio lawmaker who went to El Salvador recently on a fact-finding mission says her experience there is strengthening her resolve to fight abortion bans here at home. 

Abortion opponents demonstrate outside Governor's office
Statehouse News Bureau

Opponents of the death penalty say they are concerned about a newly proposed abortion ban that could charge a woman who gets an abortion and a doctor who provides it with a capital crime. It would make abortion punishable by life in prison without the possibility of parole or death. 

Ohio House Democrats
Jo Ingles

Leaders of the Republican dominated Ohio Legislature have expressed frustration in recent weeks that more of the bills they consider “priorities” have not been passed by lawmakers. But Democrats in the House say they think lawmakers are spending too much time debating the wrong issues. 

Opponents of abortion bills protest at Ohio Statehouse In May 2019
Jo Ingles

A new bill that would ban abortions in Ohio has been introduced by Statehouse Republicans.  A similar total ban bill was introduced last year didn’t pass. So why is this bill being introduced now? 

Abortion ban protestors dressed in Handsmaid Tale costumes at Ohio Statehouse
Jo Ingles

A new bill outlaws all abortions and subjects medical professionals who facilitate in the procedure to possible murder charges.

Women's Med Center of Dayton
Paige Pfleger, WOSU

The Ohio Department of Health has granted a license to Women’s Med Center of Dayton. It is the last abortion clinic in the Dayton area.

Rep. Stephanie Howse (at microphone)
Jo Ingles

Rep. Stephanie Howse (D-Cleveland) is one of five lawmakers from states that have or are considering abortion restrictions who are going to El Salvador to experience what life is like in a country that has an abortion ban. 

Backers of abortion pill reversal bill
Jo Ingles

Two Democratic lawmakers are fighting back on bills now under consideration that would require doctors to provide patients with information mainstream medical groups consider inaccurate and not scientifically sound. 

Mike Rogal, Shutterstock.com

The Ohio Senate has passed and sent two controversial abortion bills to the Ohio House. One involves abortion reversal, a practice that is not backed by mainstream medical professionals. That other subjects doctors to steep penalties for failing to deal with aborted remains in a particular way. 

Fizkes, Shutterstock.com

An Ohio Senate committee has paved the way for the two controversial bills to hit the chamber floor tomorrow. Both would put restrictions on doctors performing those procedures. 

Ohio's top court is, once again, has refused to hear an appeal from the last abortion clinic in Dayton. It has been fighting with the state to avoid closure of the facility. But the center isn't taking "no" for an answer. It is looking to a federal court to step in now.

Backers of bill (top) and opponents (bottom)
Jo Ingles

An Ohio Senate committee is set to hear from opponents of a bill that would provide what’s being called “reversed abortions.”

Planned Parenthood, Athens, Ohio
Dan Konik

As many as 99,000 low income Ohioans who want birth control and reproductive health care services have fewer options now that Planned Parenthood nationwide has pulled out of the federal Title X program. In nine counties, it’s the only provider that accepted Title X funds. 

Dr. Amy Acton watches as Gov. Mike DeWine speaks at a press conference on banning flavored vaping products.
Karen Kasler

The top doctor in state government said she’s concerned about one of at least three bills in the Ohio legislature that opponents say have some dubious medical science behind them.

There were slightly fewer abortions performed in the Buckeye state in 2018 than the year before. Supporters and opponents of legal abortion disagree on the reason for the decline.

The former Capital Care Network in Toledo
Facebook

Toledo’s only abortion clinic is no longer doing surgical abortions. New owners recently took over the facility. And that means it will need a new ambulatory care license to do surgical procedures. 

Outside of the Ohio Supreme Court
Dan Konik

The Ohio Supreme Court has refused to take up an appeal from Dayton’s only abortion clinic that would pave the way for it to keep operating. The Women’s Medical Center doesn’t have a transfer agreement with a local hospital as required by state law. But despite the ruling, the clinic will remain open for now.

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