background checks

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils his STRONG Ohio plan in front of law enforcement, mental health professionals and state officials.
Daniel Konik

Gov. Mike DeWine says he’s confident his STRONG Ohio gun violence package will be enacted into law, in spite of the chilly reception he’s gotten from both Republicans and Democrats.

Gov. Mike DeWine was flanked by Lt. Gov. Jon Husted and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley (to his right) and other state and local officials and law enforcement as he unveiled his STRONG Ohio plan.
Daniel Konik

Two months and a day after Gov. Mike DeWine announced he was working on a plan to address gun violence after a mass shooting in Dayton, he’s unveiled a bill that he says lawmakers will approve.

Reps. D.J. Swearingen (R-Huron, left) and Phil Plummer (R-Dayton) describe the legislation they're planning to introduce.
Andy Chow

A pair of House Republicans are pushing for a bill that would mandate better reporting into the database used for background checks on gun sales. They say it's an important step in addressing gun violence.

Gov. Mike DeWine talked to reporters after speaking to the Census 2020 Complete Count Commission meeting at the State Library of Ohio.
Karen Kasler

It’s been almost two months since Gov. Mike DeWine proposed a package of gun law and mental health policy changes, and he says lawmakers will soon look over his official language on that. 

Klattipong/Shutterstock.com

Of the seven bills the Ohio Senate's Government Oversight and Reform Committee heard today, three were bipartisan.

Karen Kasler

State lawmakers are back in action holding more hearings on gun regulation bills. And Gov. Mike DeWine is still pushing for his proposals. But Congress has yet to show an interest in moving gun issues on the federal level, with provisions getting blocked in the Senate. 

Gov. Mike DeWine unveils his background checks proposal at a Statehouse press conference.
Karen Kasler

Gov. Mike DeWine says his administration is adding another piece to his 17-point plan to reduce gun violence by calling for more required reporting into criminal databases used for background checks.

Mayor David Scheffler (R-Lancaster, left) talks with Mayor Nan Whaley (D-Dayton) and Mayor Andrew Ginther (D-Columbus). They were at the Ohio Mayors Alliance luncheon where seven cities received more than $200,000 for local educational projects.
Karen Kasler

Mayors are actively lobbying state lawmakers to consider a package of changes to gun laws and mental health policy unveiled by Gov. Mike DeWine in the wake of the Dayton mass shooting earlier this month.

Karen Kasler

Gov. John Kasich says his Medicaid department has made some changes in required background checks on behavioral and mental health providers – a requirement that came from an executive order he signed in July. Hundreds of providers said the change made them fear for their jobs.

Andy Chow

Gov. John Kasich is adding more oversight on local officials to make sure they’re entering crucial information into a national criminal database. The system is used to make sure people convicted of violent crimes can’t get a gun. But Kasich says there are gaps. 

Karen Kasler

Hundreds of mental health and addiction counselors could lose their jobs because the state is now requiring criminal background checks for people who provide Medicaid services. Some of those counselors and their employers who’d be affected by the new policy are asking state lawmakers to step in.