Coronavirus - budget

Along with individual stimulus checks and more help for the unemployed, there’s a lot of money headed to Ohio and its cities and counties once the latest $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill is signed into law.

Office of Budget and Management Director Kim Murnieks testified before the House Finance Commitee on February 4, 2021.
Karen Kasler

Preliminary Ohio budget numbers for last month show tax collections are up across the board. And that could mean a surprising change in plans in how the state will manage the financial damage from the pandemic.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine
Jo Ingles

Gov. Mike DeWine has laid out his proposed two-year state budget. It sinks $1 billion into one-time spending.

Senate Democrats outline their priorities in Jan 28, 2020 teleconference
Jo Ingles

Democrats in Ohio’s Senate have laid out their priorities for the upcoming budget. 

Dan Konik

In 2020, Republican state lawmakers introduced and passed bills to restrict fellow Republican Gov. Mike DeWine’s authority in pandemic-related health orders. Four of them drafted articles of impeachment against him. All that could make the upcoming process of creating the new two-year state budget difficult.

Construction on Licking Heights High School last year. That is among many school building projects funded by the Ohio Schools Facilities Commission, which gets money from the capital budget.
Dan Konik

Lawmakers are finally getting a look at the $2.5 billion state capital improvements budget, delayed for months by the pandemic.

Ohio Theatre, June 2020
Jo Ingles

The Columbus Museum of Art has announced it was laying off 39 employees and slashing their budget due to money lost during coronavirus. It’s the latest example of an arts organization that has suffered because of COVID-19. But there might be some help coming soon from the state for struggling performing arts theaters.

Karen Kasler

The state’s tax revenue report for July was the first one showing gains in three months. But Ohio’s chief budget officer says she expects the economic effects of the pandemic to last for far longer than the pandemic does – perhaps years.

Daniel Konik

After three months of declines, Ohio took in 8% more in taxes than the Office of Budget and Management estimated, though much of that is connected to the delay of the tax deadline to July 15. But there was a different kind of growth in the state’s July report that could be concerning.

Democrats talk about issues on Zoom
Jo Ingles

Democrats in the Ohio House say lawmakers need to deal with some important business this summer instead of taking time off. 

OBM Director Kim Murnieks testified on the state budget before the House Finance Committee in March 2019.
Karen Kasler

Using three quarters of a billion dollars in cuts and some reserve cash and federal Medicaid funding, the state of Ohio has staved off a budget deficit for the fiscal year that ends on June 30. But there’s a huge shortfall ahead for the year that begins on July 1.

Gov. Mike DeWine, Ohio Budget and Management Director Kimberly Murnieks and Lt. Gov. Jon Husted rolled out the state budget in March 2019.
Karen Kasler

Ohio’s state budget office estimates $2.5 billion in spending will have to be cut to balance the budget for the fiscal year that starts in July.  And that means Ohio’s more than 51,000 state workers will take some hits.

Lower traffic levels have allowed some ODOT work that would normally be shifted to night hours to continue in daylight.
Karen Kasler

The slowdown of the economy because of COVID-19 has had a huge impact on traffic and transit. And even though the state’s gas tax that funds road construction went up by 10.5 cents a gallon last July, the Ohio Department of Transportation is bracing for a big hit. 

Andy Chow

The latest round of state budget cuts to offset the economic impact of COVID-19 has caused many departments to reevaluate their programs, this includes the H2Ohio fund which sets money aside to keep Lake Erie, and other water sources, clean.

OBM Director Kim Murnieks testified on the state budget before the House Finance Committee in March 2019.
Karen Kasler

The state budget is a sea of red, as income and sales tax collections are less than half of what was predicted for this month. There is one specific area of the budget that is showing big increases, but it’s not what state officials want to see.