coronavirus - business

Some demonstrators at an anti-mask rally at the Statehouse in July. Event planners said security would be provided by "militia". Proud Boys are often identified by black collared polo shirts with yellow stripes on the sleeves.
Karen Kasler

Federal authorities have charged more than a dozen men with plotting to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and overthrow the government. And the feds say that group did some of its planning this summer in Ohio, where extremist groups have been active since at least 1994.

Gov. Mike DeWine
Jo Ingles

Bars throughout the state have been begging Gov. Mike DeWine to loosen the restriction put in place under a coronavirus order that requires them to cut off sales at 10 pm.  Now, DeWine signals those rules might be relaxed soon.

E F Photography, Shutterstock.com

If you’ve been missing picking that perfect donut out of the glass case to go with your morning coffee, your wait should soon be over. The state has given the green light to retailers to once again sell buffet style and to-go self-serve items that went away months ago to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Gov. Mike DeWine signs House Bill 606 in a virtual signing ceremony from his home in Cedarville. Lt. Gov. Jon Husted was in his Columbus office, and Speaker Bob Cupp (R-Lima) and Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) joined from their homes.
Ohio Channel screenshot

As he hinted he would, Gov. Mike DeWine has signed a law that will shield first responders, businesses and schools from COVID-19 related lawsuits. It’s one of the first coronavirus immunity laws in the country.

The House was in session for the first time since July. Masks are not required in the House chamber. Most Democrats wear them and many Republicans do not.
Karen Kasler

State lawmakers have sent on to Gov. Mike DeWine a bill to shield first responders, businesses and schools from COVID-19 related lawsuits. The bill had passed the House overwhelmingly in May, but this time Democrats had serious concerns with how the Senate changed it.

A closed sign on a Columbus area business a few weeks after all businesses deemed non-essential were shut down.
Karen Kasler

A lawsuit has been filed in federal court, asking it to remove the state of emergency declared in March that led to restrictions imposed on the state’s businesses to prevent coronavirus spread. 

Karen Kasler

Ohio lawmakers will hold a final vote next week on a bill that would shield first responders, businesses and schools from coronavirus-related lawsuits from patients, customers or students.

A restaurant in northeast Columbus advertises dine-in service.
Karen Kasler

More than half of the state’s restaurants and bars could be out of business soon, according to a survey by the Ohio Restaurant Association. Owners of those establishments say the restrictions put on them because of COVID-19 are hurting their businesses. And they fear it will get worse.

Arina P. Habich, Shutterstock.com

The Ohio Liquor Control Commission adopted a rule banning restaurants and bars in Ohio from serving alcohol after 10 p.m. Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) says this rule can help stem the spread of COVID-19. But restaurant and bar owners believe they're being unfairly targeted.

Robert Kneschke, Shutterstock.com

The COVID19 pandemic has hurt a lot of businesses but not the residential real estate market in Ohio. And there are a couple of factors that are at play here.

Aleksander Krsmanovic, Shutterstock.com

A new report from a group of business leaders shows many Ohio companies cannot get back on their feet because their employees no longer have affordable day care options. 

Evgeny Atamanenko, Shutterstock.com

Nine dance studios are suing the state of Ohio over mandated shutdowns and limitations imposed on their businesses. 

A neon sign over a bar in Columbus.
Karen Kasler

A bill that would allow bars and restaurants to use parking lots, green space and even streets for social distancing for customers is now being considered by the Senate. But there’s a provision in the bill that didn’t get much attention till it was on the floor – a plan to extend the hours that bars can stay open.

Joe Hendrickson, Shutterstock.com

Summertime is prime time for amusement parks, zoos and other venues. But the months of shutdown and the limits on operations – plus safety concerns from consumers – are all having a big impact on communities that rely on tourism dollars.

Aleksander Krsmanovic, shutterstock.com

The state of Ohio has not been denying anyone jobless benefits for COVID-19 related reasons, such as concerns about contracting coronavirus on the job or being ordered to quarantine. But that is changing for people who can’t find child care.

TORWAISTUDIO, shutterstock.com

Reports of child abuse in Ohio are down dramatically, but those working in the field say they’re concerned that the real incidents of child abuse are actually on the rise. Advocates are preparing for a surge of new reports that could come from child care providers, camps and eventually schools as those facilities all open up.

Pegasus pics, Shutterstock.com

A court in eastern Ohio has dismissed a case that brought criminal charges against the owner of a diner in Cambridge for failing to comply with rules set forth in the state’s reopening plan for restaurants. This was the outcome the state’s Attorney General had requested.

Monkey Business Images, Shutterstock.com

The owners of eight bars and restaurants in Northeast Ohio are suing Gov. Mike DeWine and Department of Health Director Amy Acton over rules put in place for restaurants to reopen following closure due to coronavirus. 

The view fron Kings Island Tower, a replica of the Eiffel Tower, in May 2019.
Karen Kasler

Cedar Point and Kings Island weren’t included in the list of entertainment venues that can reopen on June 10. The parks have filed a lawsuit in Warren County, demanding to be allowed to open as well.  The Kalahari Resort and water park is also part of the lawsuit.

The latest model on the Ohio Department of Health's coronavirus website, showing a peak of around 1,600 cases April 18.  The state recorded a high of 1,353 cases on April 19.
Ohio Department of Health

With most of Ohio’s businesses allowed to open up, experts who’ve worked with the state on the modeling it used to create its COVID-19 policies are evaluating their predictions for what’s ahead.

A "closed" sign is posted on a closed duckpin bowling alley and bar in downtown Columbus.
Karen Kasler

1.2 million Ohioans have filed jobless claims since mid-March. And as Ohio’s businesses reopen, workers are concerned about the availability of child care, the cleanliness of their workplaces and the safety of vulnerable family members as they go back to work. And the agency processing claims has seen that concern too.

The Stratford Barn - Delaware County Historical Society
Jo Ingles

Wedding venues, banquet halls and large catering facilities can reopen June 1st. And some venues say they are ready to open now.

The Ohio State Fair opened last year on July 24. 934,925 people attended the fair last year, a slight increase over 2018.
Daniel Konik

For the first time since World War II, the Ohio State Fair won’t go on as scheduled. The fair was set to start on July 29.

Watershed Distillery Facebook page

Ohio’s bars and restaurants would be able to expand their seating and service into parking lots or public grounds under a new bill at the Statehouse. And they’d also be able to sell alcohol for delivery through third-party services such as GrubHub or Doordash.

A tweet of the scene at Standard Hall in the Short North neighborhood of Columbus on Friday, as shared by @musicsaves41. Friday was the first night Ohio bars and restaurants could offer outdoor dining since they were shut down March 15.
@musicsaves41/Twitter

It was a big weekend for the bars and restaurants that reopened outdoor patios. Many chose not to open, and most of those that did observed social distancing. But pictures of some that didn’t were widely circulated on social media.

The Backstretch, Delaware Ohio
Roger Ingles

As restaurants and bars that had been closed since March opened for outdoor dining this weekend, pictures of packed patios from around the state appeared to show operators and patrons ignoring social distancing protocols. And some restaurants didn’t open their patios for service at all.

The Spot, located in Grandview west of downtown Columbus, is one of the 35 independent gyms suing the state over its shutdown order.
Karen Kasler

A group of 35 independent gyms and fitness centers is suing the state, saying they could reopen for business safely but they’re not being allowed to.

Lower traffic levels have allowed some ODOT work that would normally be shifted to night hours to continue in daylight.
Karen Kasler

The slowdown of the economy because of COVID-19 has had a huge impact on traffic and transit. And even though the state’s gas tax that funds road construction went up by 10.5 cents a gallon last July, the Ohio Department of Transportation is bracing for a big hit. 

Half Price Books
Dan Konik

Many of Ohio’s retail stores that had been closed for the past few weeks opened today. There was a light yet steady stream of shoppers inside a Columbus area book store.

Andriiii, Shutterstock.com

Non-essential businesses that were closed during the past month due to COVID-19 are now starting to reopen. But some worry that’s happening too quickly without proper safeguards.

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