coronavirus - nursing homes

Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Ohio is taking the first steps to lift the more than two month old ban on visits to some long-term care facilities. Officials says they want to expand this in stages.

A sanitizer station set up at a Fairfield County nursing home a few days before visitors were banned on March 13 because of coronavirus concerns.
Karen Kasler

Residents at long-term care facilities, such as nursing homes, make up more than three-quarters of the deaths related to COVID-19 in Ohio. Gov. Mike DeWine says he is now ramping up efforts to combat this problem with a new strategy.

Ohio National Guard/Twitter

Ohio National Guard members have been performing a variety of duties during the COVID19 pandemic. But the roles of members are changing a bit as time progresses.

A hand sanitizer station at a nursing home in central Ohio. Nursing homes were banned from allowing visitors in March.
Karen Kasler

More than three quarters of confirmed COVID-19 deaths in Ohio have come from nursing homes. This week’s total is a 30% increase from a week ago.

The entrance to Continuing Health Care in Gahanna, where two staff members have tested positive for COVID-19 tests, but no residents have.
Karen Kasler

There have been at least 674 deaths from coronavirus at nursing homes in Ohio, which is 43% of the state’s confirmed COVID-19 deaths. After saying for weeks that nursing home residents who have symptoms are tested but limitations prevented mass testing, there’s a plan for more tests in long-term care facilities.

Kiselev Andrey Valerevich, shutterstock.com

The state has now added deaths from COVID-19 in nursing homes to its coronavirus tracking website – confirming that nearly 300 people have died of the disease in those facilities.

Darwin Brandis, shutterstock.com

Mass testing in three Ohio prisons has turned up 3,853 coronavirus cases among inmates and 379 prison workers, showing how fast the virus can spread in congregate settings. Now the state’s long term care providers are hoping for the same thing in more than a thousand nursing homes, assisted living communities and other facilities.

Suwin/shutterstock.com

The state has taken down its list of COVID-19 cases in long term care facilities on its website, which came after an order that required those facilities to report positive cases to families within 24 hours. But Gov. Mike DeWine says the change is only temporary.

Doug Steele (left) and his son Matthew enjoy a visit at the Cincinnati facility where Doug lives.
Matthew Steele

UPDATE: The state is now listing 811 cases of COVID-19 at 106 nursing homes in 31 counties.

Nine percent of the confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ohio are in long-term care facilities such as nursing homes and assisted living communities – and some residents and staff are among the dead. The state says it will shed light on more information about that, but some data will stay hidden.

A sanitizer station set up at a Fairfield County nursing home a few days before visitors were banned on March 13 because of coronavirus concerns.
Karen Kasler

Gov. Mike DeWine has announced a new public health order requiring nursing homes to notify the public about cases of COVID-19 at their facilities.

GagliardiPhotography, Shutterstock.com

Nearly a dozen people at a nursing home in Washington died from COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus. Nursing homes throughout Ohio are being urged to take precautions to prevent coronavirus in their facilities so that doesn’t happen here.