coronavirus - unemployment

Daniel Konik

Payments to more than a quarter of a million non-traditional unemployment cases in Ohio are being halted and are under investigation. The state says most are part of a scam that’s resulted in hundreds of millions of dollars in fraudulent payments in other states.

VITALIL VODOLAZSKYL, SHUTTERSTOCK.COM)

An extra 20 weeks of unemployment compensation will be made available to eligible Ohioans once they have exhausted their other benefits. 

Vitalil Vodolazskyl, Shutterstock.com

A collection of health and human services advocates are urging state leaders to immediately work on revamping the unemployment compensation system in order to avoid another backlog in the future.

House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) watches as Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) speaks at a press conference in April 2019.
Andy Chow

The fund that the state uses to pay jobless benefits is now broke – which was predicted even before the pandemic. And now state leaders are struggling with how to pay back the money being borrowed to keep those unemployment checks coming.

Dan Konik

The fund by which Ohio pays jobless benefits is officially broke, and the state has asked to borrow more than $3 billion so payments can keep going out to unemployed workers.

The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services building in downtown Columbus.
Karen Kasler

The state has paid out more than $3.8 billion in unemployment benefits to over 683,000 Ohioans since mid-March, more than it’s ever paid out in a full year. And the state has paid $1.4 billion in federally funded pandemic unemployment assistance nearly 200,000 people who wouldn’t normally qualify for unemployment.

Vitalil Vodolazskyl, Shutterstock.com

The woman in charge of the state agency that administers the unemployment system was on the hot seat yesterday as a panel of state lawmakers questioned her about inefficiencies in the system. 

Rep. David Leland (D-Columbus) at a press conference with other Ohio House Democrats in 2019.
Ohio House

As Ohio opens for business again, many workers have qualms about returning to their jobs. Some Democrats are proposing a bill they say will protect those workers.

A "closed" sign is posted on a closed duckpin bowling alley and bar in downtown Columbus.
Karen Kasler

1.2 million Ohioans have filed jobless claims since mid-March. And as Ohio’s businesses reopen, workers are concerned about the availability of child care, the cleanliness of their workplaces and the safety of vulnerable family members as they go back to work. And the agency processing claims has seen that concern too.

"Closed" signs on the front of a restaurant in Bexley near downtown Columbus
Karen Kasler

Ohio’s unemployment rate nearly tripled in just a month and set a record as COVID-19 closures and the state’s stay at home order fully hit economic activity.

Vitalil Vodolazskyl, Shutterstock.com

Deloitte, a consulting company contracted by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS), is investigating a data breach in the system launched last week to pay benefits to 1099 and self-employed workers. A mass message was sent to applicants letting them know that their personal information was left unconcealed for a period of time.

A sign on a closed barbershop in Westerville. Hair stylists are among the workers who have been waiting to apply for benefits.
Karen Kasler

This morning brought long-awaited news for the self-employed, independent contractors and 1099 workers in Ohio – the system to pay them jobless benefits is live.

A closed sign in a store near downtown Columbus
Karen Kasler

The Ohio Department Job and Family Services has paid more than $2 billion in unemployment claims to nearly 560,000 Ohioans since mid-March. But that’s only half of the 1.1 million claims that have been filed.

Vicki Warnecke, Olentangy Apparel
Dan Konik

Ohio’s retail businesses that were shut down as non-essential are being allowed to open Tuesday. And by the end of next week, many restaurants, bars and hair salons will also reopen. 

A nearly empty parking lot at a shopping area on the northeast side of Columbus in April 2020.
Daniel Konik

The state has paid out more than $1.7 billion to over a half a million jobless Ohioans in the last seven weeks. And while 85 percent of claims have either been paid or denied, there are still reports of people having trouble filing claims via the web or over the phone.

Statehouse News Bureau

The state has paid out $858 million dollars to nearly 350,000 Ohioans who’ve lost their jobs in the last five weeks. And more claims are expected to come in from people who normally can’t file for jobless benefits but will be able to under a federal aid bill.