Coronavirus

Gov. Mike DeWine speaks to reporters
Jo Ingles

Gov. Mike DeWine is closing K-12 schools, banning many large public events and stopping most visits at the state's nursing homes as part of a comprehensive strategy to combat the spread of coronavirus.

Lisa Hamler-Fugitt, executive director of the Ohio Association of Food Banks (right), checks out the produce while she talks with employees at the Mid-Ohio Food Bank in Grove City, just south of Columbus
Karen Kasler

Congress is considering a bill that would make it easier for low-income people to get emergency food assistance during the COVID-19 outbreak. And advocates for foodbanks are requesting the state and communities make some changes too.

Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton
Andy Chow

State health officials say the fourth confirmed case of COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus, had no contact with other cases and didn't travel overseas. This signals the start of community spread in Ohio, leading Gov. Mike DeWine to issue more public health orders.

Coronavirus hotline call center
Jo Ingles

Gov. Mike DeWine says he thinks the state’s Coronavirus hotline needs to be moved to a larger location because the tight space it is located in now is conducive to passing the potentially deadly disease. The hotline is getting an average of two calls per minute. 

Andy Chow

State officials are trying to raise awareness about the importance of everyone doing their part in preventing the spread of coronavirus. As the Ohio Department of Health explains, this is a population health crisis, and containing the virus takes a group effort.

Andy Chow

State leaders are urging people around Ohio to avoid large crowds and to do whatever they can to prevent the spread of germs, calling this a critical moment to stem the increase in coronavirus cases.

Secretary of State Frank LaRose at a morning press conference, along with Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton, Franklin County Board of Elections Director Ed Leonard and  Franklin County Public Health Commissioner Joe Mazzola.
Karen Kasler

Thousands of Ohio voters are finding out if they want to vote on election day, they’ll have to go to a new place to cast their ballots for the St. Patrick’s Day primary next week. The state is moving 128 polling places out of nursing homes and senior residential facilities because of concerns about spreading coronavirus to residents.

(NOTE: This story has been updated with a list of the new polling places.)

SFIO CRACHO/Shutterstock

Public health officials are recommending the implementation of social distancing in places where coronavirus is spreading. A top tech official with the state is urging businesses to prepare now for the likely event that happens in Ohio.

Andy Chow

The worldwide outbreak of the coronavirus disease known as COVID-19 has officially landed in Ohio with Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) immediately signing a state of emergency order after learning about the first three confirmed cases.

SamaraHeisz/Shutterstock.com

The American Red Cross says blood supplies are typically low this time of year but the organization fears that situation could get even worse. 

Ohio Department of Health conducting tests for COVID-19 with new testing equipment.
Ohio Department of Health

The state now has the ability to conduct tests for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Due to limited resources the state has created a protocol to determine who to prioritize for testing.

Andy Chow

The state has opened a call center for anyone who has questions about the potential spread of coronavirus and COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, while urging people around the state to prepare.

GagliardiPhotography, Shutterstock.com

Nearly a dozen people at a nursing home in Washington died from COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus. Nursing homes throughout Ohio are being urged to take precautions to prevent coronavirus in their facilities so that doesn’t happen here.  

Andy Chow

Gov. Mike DeWine is issuing a public health order to bar spectators from attending the Arnold Sports Festival competitions, except for the finals tomorrow night and Saturday night, due to coronavirus concerns.

Dr. Amy Acton, with Gov. Mike DeWine alongside, talks to reporters before the statewide coronavirus summit.
Andy Chow

There are still no confirmed cases of coronavirus in Ohio, but the state department of health reports three people now under investigation.

SamaraHeisz5/Shutterstock.com

UPDATE: The Senate has voted 96-1 to pass the coronavirus emergency bill. Only Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) voted against it.

The U.S. House has passed a bipartisan $8.3 billion emergency bill to help states deal with coronavirus, sending it to the Senate, where it will get support from Ohio's two Senators.

Andy Chow

There are currently no cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus, in Ohio. And while public health officials say it's only a matter of time, they are still urging people to take preventative measures.

Andy Chow

The Arnold Sports Festival in Columbus has become the largest mass gathering in the U.S. to be all but cancelled because of concerns surrounding the potential spread of the coronavirus.

Rep. Janine Boyd (D-Cleveland Heights)
Andy Chow

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) and state health officials are urging people to stay home if they are showing any signs of being sick. This is a major step towards preventing germs as cold and flu season continues and concerns about the coronavirus grow. But Democratic lawmakers say staying home from work isn't an option for many Ohioans. 

A Columbus grocery store has some empty space in the paper products aisle. Some stores are reporting items selling out or shortages of some items, such as hand sanitizer.
Karen Kasler

As the coronavirus spreads, people are being urged to prepare by stocking up on food and supplies, checking to see if they can work from home if schools and workplaces are shut down, and staying home if they’re sick. But these aren’t options for many people in Ohio.

creativeneko/Shutterstock

Public health officials from around the world are keeping a watchful eye on the spread of the coronavirus as more countries are reporting an increase in infections. In Ohio, state and local officials are working on several preventative measures to keep the virus from occurring.

Samara Heisz, Shutterstock.com

Two Miami University students are quarantined for possible Coronavirus. The state's top health officials are watching for more possible infections. But Ohio Governor Mike DeWine says there’s another deadly virus that people should be concerned about.

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