Diane Grendell

The governor's ceremonial office in the Statehouse
Karen Kasler

Gov. Mike DeWine is rejecting a proposal from a Republican lawmaker who wants to cancel the state of emergency order he issued in March, as the pandemic was just beginning. 

Former Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton, flanked by Lt. Gov. Jon Husted (right) and Gov. Mike DeWine, speaks at a press conference on March 9, the day the state of emergency order was signed.
Andy Chow

A Republican representative who’s been critical of Ohio’s response to coronavirus has proposed a bill to cancel the state of emergency order from March - the foundation of many of the state’s COVID restrictions.

Gov. Mike DeWine signs House Bill 606 in a virtual signing ceremony from his home in Cedarville. Lt. Gov. Jon Husted was in his Columbus office, and Speaker Bob Cupp (R-Lima) and Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) joined from their homes.
Ohio Channel screenshot

As he hinted he would, Gov. Mike DeWine has signed a law that will shield first responders, businesses and schools from COVID-19 related lawsuits. It’s one of the first coronavirus immunity laws in the country.

The House was in session for the first time since July. Masks are not required in the House chamber. Most Democrats wear them and many Republicans do not.
Karen Kasler

State lawmakers have sent on to Gov. Mike DeWine a bill to shield first responders, businesses and schools from COVID-19 related lawsuits. The bill had passed the House overwhelmingly in May, but this time Democrats had serious concerns with how the Senate changed it.

Karen Kasler

Ohio lawmakers will hold a final vote next week on a bill that would shield first responders, businesses and schools from coronavirus-related lawsuits from patients, customers or students.

People Image Studio, Shutterstock.com

The Ohio Senate is being asked to consider a bill passed along party lines in the House that requires new reporting standards for COVID19.