FirstEnergy

Rep. Casey Weinstein (D-Hudson) and Rep. Jeff Crossman (D-Parma)
Andy Chow

Democrats in the Ohio House want Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) to fire two members of his staff in response to new information to come out related to the nuclear bailout bribery case. But DeWine's office says that's not going to happen.

Former Congressman Jim Renacci, who's also the Medina County Republican Party chair, held a press conference on the Medina County Courthouse steps.
Screenshots/Facebook

Ohio Democrats have been talking up last week’s plea deal from FirstEnergy as proof of Republican corruption in state government. But now Gov. Mike DeWine’s main opponent in next year’s GOP primary is joining in.

Gov. Mike DeWine takes questions during a press conference on colleges and the state's new anti-hazing law on July 26, 2021.
Dan Konik

Gov. Mike DeWine has made his first public comments since last week’s plea deal from FirstEnergy in the federal corruption case involving the nuclear power plant bailout law known as House Bill 6.

Perry Nuclear Power Plant stacks
Dan Konik

FirstEnergy will pay a $230 million fine in a plea deal with federal prosecutors in the federal investigation into the $1.6 billion bailout for Ohio’s two nuclear energy plants. But some are saying state leaders have not done enough to prevent back room dealing that can lead to scandals like this. 

The Davis-Besse and Perry Nuclear Power Plants, owned by Energy Harbor. The company used to be FirstEnergy Solutions, a subsidiary of FirstEnergy.
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FirstEnergy will pay $230 million after entering into a deferred prosecution agreement over charges that the company bribed then-House Speaker Larry Householder and former Public Utilities Commission chair Sam Randazzo.

FirstEnergy headquarters in Akron
Tim Ruddell/WKSU

FirstEnergy executives say they're looking at entering an agreement with federal prosecutors that could avoid criminal charges related to the $61 million bribery investigation.

FirstEnergy headquarters in Akron
Tim Ruddell/WKSU

Federal energy regulators are conducting an investigation into FirstEnergy, digging into the utility's actions during the debate over a sweeping energy law in the form of House Bill 6.

FirstEnergy headquarters in Akron
Tim Ruddell/WKSU

FirstEnergy has filed a report with the Securities and Exchange Commission saying it has identified certain transactions that date back as far as ten years ago. The large electric company says these transactions include amounts collected from customers.

FirstEnergy headquarters in Akron
Tim Ruddell/WKSU

FirstEnergy's credit rating has hit below investment grade or "junk" status by the three big rating agencies; Fitch, Moody's, and S&P. It's another blow to the company that has experienced a tumultuous year after being linked to a $61 million alleged racketeering scheme.

Securities and Exchange Commission
AevanStock/Shutterstock

FirstEnergy's filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission says former senior management members were fired after an internal investigation discovered certain executives made a $4 million payment to an entity with ties to an unnamed state regulator.

Matt Borges leaves federal court
Andy Chow

Four major players in Ohio's capital have pleaded not guilty to federal racketeering charges. They're accused of being part of a bribery scheme that pushed for the passage and defense of the nuclear power plant bailout.

Daniel Konik

A split Ohio Supreme Court has blocked a charge FirstEnergy customers have been paying since 2017, saying state regulators improperly allowed it to go forward.  This charge cost customers as much as $200 million for each of those two years.

FirstEnergy

FirstEnergy Solutions blames the current energy market for its decision to shutter its Ohio coal plant in Ohio within the next four years. It seems to be the final chapter in FirstEnergy’s struggle to keep its coal plants operational.

Jerry Sharp/Shutterstock

The owner of Ohio’s nuclear plants has taken the next step in their plans to shut down those facilities as part of its bankruptcy filing. FirstEnergy says there’s still time to reverse course.

Consumer, business, and environmental groups are rallying to oppose FirstEnergy’s request for a federal bailout now that the company’s subsidiary FirstEnergy Solutions has filed for bankruptcy. This could be the major utility company’s last shot at keeping its nuclear and coal plants open. 

Andy Chow

One of Ohio’s largest utilities is moving forward with a plan to shut down its coal and nuclear power plants after filing for bankruptcy. The move has spurred action among its workers.

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FirstEnergy says it’s starting the process of shutting down its two nuclear power plants in northwest and northeast Ohio, saying it can’t compete with lower natural gas prices. But the company says it’s willing to work with lawmakers to find ways to keep them operating.

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Another clash may be coming between Republican state lawmakers and Gov. John Kasich. And it’s about a bill on nuclear power plants, but the issue may be more about money.

Jerry Sharp/Shutterstock

The utility that owns Ohio’s two nuclear power sites say it needs to charge its customers more in order save the struggling plants. The senator who’s proposing a bill that would allow that to happen is accused of having a conflict of interest.

Jerry Sharp/Shutterstock

One of Ohio’s largest utilities is once again going to state policymakers looking for a way to get a boost for its struggling power plants. 

Andy Chow

Ohio has a big coal industry, but also has a lot of land for wind energy development. And state officials seems to be floating in the middle as far as energy policy goes. The energy issue pulled the state in two different directions.

Sammis Power Plant
FirstEnergy

One of Ohio’s largest energy companies could be closing or selling all of its power plants within the next two years. 

For nearly 2 years Akron based First Energy has lobbied for permission to increase fees on customer’s bills to fund infrastructure improvements. Earlier this week the Ohio Public Utilities Commission said yes.  The new fee is expected to raise $200 million dollars a year.

Sammis Power Plant
FirstEnergy

One of Ohio’s major utilities is shutting down or selling five more coal units by 2020, another sign that the future of coal may not be so bright. 

Andy Chow

Something as simple as flipping a switch can turn the lights on and off in your home. But there are many, major, complicated decisions that take place in order to keep those lights on. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports in part one of a three-part series, these decisions have reached a critical point that could change the landscape of the energy industry in Ohio.

AEP

State officials, utilities and other groups have worked on deregulating the energy market in Ohio for more than a decade. Now two major utility companies want to go back toward re-regulation after the feds nixed their temporary rate hike plan. 

Wikimedia

It’s not every day that a group known for defending the free market celebrates federal intervention. But a conservative group in Ohio is saying the feds made the right choice by blocking a temporary rate hike plan from AEP and FirstEnergy. 

Public Utilities Commission of Ohio

Just a few weeks after a controversial decision that federal regulators have now overturned, the head of the panel that regulates Ohio’s utilities has announced he’s quitting.

Karen Kasler

Federal regulators have blocked Akron-based FirstEnergy and Columbus-based American Electric Power from imposing controversial short-term rate increases on customers to bring in money for struggling coal and nuclear plants - deals the companies said were essential to market stability but critics said were "bailouts".

Karen Kasler

Ohioans could see a new charge in their electric bills as early as June, now that state regulators have approved plans by FirstEnergy and AEP to guarantee income for struggling coal plants. But opponents of the costs say the fight isn’t over. 

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