Gov. John Kasich

Fmr. Gov. John Kasich
Statehouse News Bureau

Not long after new Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s inaugural, former Gov. John Kasich is announcing a new gig. 

Over the years, Kasich has brought forward a lot of ideas, and his tone has changed dramatically, as he’s worked to accomplish his goals and create a national persona as a Trump critic and a promoter of bipartisan compromise - with mixed results.

Kurhan, Shutterstock.com

UPDATED at 5:45 p.m. on Wednesday, December 26, 2018 A spokesman for the Ohio House says this is not one of the overrides lawmakers are still considering at this point.

Ohio lawmakers are scheduled to come back to the Statehouse tomorrow to possibly override some of Gov. John Kasich’s vetoes over the two-year session. One of those could affect 400,000 Ohioans in Medicaid expansion.

Gov. John Kasich
credit Dan Konik

Gov. John Kasich has vetoed the so called "Heartbeat Bill" but has signed another into law. 

Karen Kasler

Gov. John Kasich has included a new category into state protections against discrimination in an executive order he signed Wednesday. But those protections might not last very long.

Governor John Kasich at Columbus Metropolitan Club
Jo Ingles

In what’s being billed as his last public appearance as governor, John Kasich says there’s a reason why Ohio Republicans held the state’s top offices and many legislative seats when their colleagues in other areas of the country didn’t. 

Ohio Statehouse
Statehouse News Bureau

A controversial bill that bans abortion at the point a fetal heartbeat can be detected is on its way to Gov. John Kasich. Overnight, the Ohio House passed the bill 53-32 with changes made by the Senate Tuesday.

Gov. John Kasich (left), Speaker Ryan Smith (R-Bidwell) and Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) all spoke at the unveiling of the permanent display of Ohio's two constitutions at the Statehouse in November. But they did not appear together.
Karen Kasler

As state lawmakers race toward the end of this lame duck legislative session, they’ve been considering two bills that Gov. John Kasich opposes – the six-week “Heartbeat Bill” abortion ban and the “Stand Your Ground” self-defense bill.  And if he vetoes them as promised, lawmakers would have to come back to vote on them again during the holiday break.

Janet Folger Porter in Senate committee
Jo Ingles

Abortion is a big deal for Ohio lawmakers as they proceed through the Lame Duck session of this legislature. And there are two bills that could end up on Governor Kasich’s desk soon.

Evangelical leaders and Rep. Christina Hagan (R-Alliance)  at Ohio Statehouse
Jo Ingles

Backers of the so called “Heartbeat Bill,” legislation that bans abortion at the point a fetal heartbeat is detected, are getting some help from evangelical leaders. And they are sending a strong message to Gov. John Kasich and Ohio lawmakers.

Supporters Of Heartbeat Bill Outside Recent Trump Rally
Karen Kasler

The so-called “Heartbeat Bill”, which Gov. John Kasich promises to veto, had been likely to come up for a vote today in an Ohio House committee. But there were too many questions about the controversial bill that would ban abortion at the point a fetal heartbeat is detected for it to proceed to a vote. 

Opponents of Heartbeat Bill gather on the Statehouse steps, a few hours before a hearing on the bill in a Senate committee.
Jo Ingles

"Ho, ho, hey, hey, Roe v. Wade is here to stay." That's what opponents of the so-called "Heartbeat Bill" chanted on the steps leading into the Ohio Statehouse. The activists said the bill would deny legal abortion before many women know they are pregnant. 

Tim Dubravetz

Gov. John Kasich says he’s “seriously considering” running for president again, and that he’d prefer to do so as a conservative Republican. But he’s been a vocal critic of President Trump and has reached out to national Democrats, so pundits have been suggesting that he’s a moderate Republican. The outgoing governor has some thoughts about where he stands in the political spectrum as he considers his next move.

Daniel Konik

State lawmakers have overridden a quarter of Gov. John Kasich’s 48 vetoes. And they could do more in the next two weeks.  And Kasich has said he’d also veto the so-called "Stand Your Ground" self-defense bill and the six-week abortion ban called the Heartbeat Bill that recently passed the House.  Those vetoes and what lawmakers do about them could say something about the outgoing governor's relationship with his fellow Republicans in the legislature.

Tim Dubravetz

For the second year in a row, Ohio lawmakers are considering delaying tougher new requirements for a high school diploma because thousands of students are in danger of not being able to graduate.  Gov. John Kasich said he's concerned about the looming graduation crisis and education in general.

Tim Dubravetz

Gov. John Kasich says he’s seriously considering another run for president, the strongest suggestion yet that he might try another campaign.

Tim Dubravetz

Gov. John Kasich says he’ll be talking to General Motors about its decision to shut down the assembly plant in Lordstown, potentially putting 1500 people out of work. But he’s sounding like all isn’t lost even if the plant closes.

Ohiochannel.org

Sometimes, when a governor wants something done and the legislature doesn’t want to pass a law to do it, the governor can go through a panel of lawmakers. But in a showdown between the legislature and the governor, it’s going to be more difficult for that to happen in the future. 

Submitted by Kellie Copeland

The Ohio House has already passed the heartbeat bill which would ban abortions as soon as a fetal heartbeat can be detected. The Ohio Senate appears ready to follow suit. And just as he did before, Gov. John Kasich says he’ll veto it. But advocates for legal abortion say Kasich’s veto is not enough.

Karen Kasler

Two controversial bills that passed the Ohio House last week are on their way to the Senate. But Gov. John Kasich is once again saying they are likely to run into roadblocks if they make it to his desk.

Dan Konik

Gov. John Kasich gave his final State of the State speech, at Otterbein University in his hometown of Westerville. And while he shuffled from one thought to the next, he didn’t discuss policies for the state.

Dan Konik

Gov. John Kasich is preparing to deliver his final State of the State address in his hometown of Westerville. The governor’s speech is expected to cover more than just policy for his last year in office.

Office of Gov. John Kasich

Gov. John Kasich has delivered his last six State of the State speeches in cities around Ohio – and not in the Statehouse. He now says he wants to give his final address to a joint session of the General Assembly March 6 in Westerville, 15 miles north of the Capitol.  And some legislators have been concerned about the move of the annual address.

Daniel Konik

Gov. John Kasich has made a rare move regarding his last State of the State speech - he’s already picked the date and location months before it’ll happen.

Jo ingles

Gov. John Kasich’s speech was getting praise from his Republican colleagues in the legislature.

Daniel Konik

Budget, taxes, education, drugs - Gov.  John Kasich covered a lot of ground in his State of the State speech in Sandusky. And he also made a little news.

Andy Chow

Gov. John Kasich is taking the state government on the road to Sandusky for his annual State of the State speech. The city that sits on the coast of Lake Erie is preparing to tell Kasich and other leaders what they need to know about their town. There are many stories to tell, with one common thread.

Ernst Sibberson/Shutterstock.com

Ohio’s state government is taking its show on the road with Gov. John Kasich preparing to deliver his annual State of the State speech in Sandusky. 

Statehouse News Bureau

It's not quite Powerball, but Gov. John Kasich’s office is offering up seats to his State of the State speech next months through a lottery.

Karen Kasler

Gov. John Kasich has decided where and when he wants to deliver his seventh annual address to the legislature.

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