Government/Politics

Political news

Opponents of abortion bills protest at Ohio Statehouse In May 2019
Jo Ingles

A new bill that would ban abortions in Ohio has been introduced by Statehouse Republicans.  A similar total ban bill was introduced last year didn’t pass. So why is this bill being introduced now? 

A satellite photo of the Maumee Bay taken on July 30, 2019 shows what NASA Earth Observatory called a "severe bloom of blue-green algae" spreading across the western basin of Lake Erie.
Joshua Stevens, earthobservatory.nasa.gov

Ohio farmers say they’re on board with the state’s plans to slow down agricultural runoff into Lake Erie, which Gov. Mike DeWine has said is the biggest contributor to toxic algae blooms. 

Abortion ban protestors dressed in Handsmaid Tale costumes at Ohio Statehouse
Jo Ingles

A new bill outlaws all abortions and subjects medical professionals who facilitate in the procedure to possible murder charges.

The Maumee River watershed, including the Maumee River in Toledo, includes more than 5,000 square miles in 18 counties. The H2Ohio program is focused on this watershed, but it will be expanded throughout the state.
Christopher Boswell/SHUTTERSTOCK.com

Gov. Mike DeWine has released details of his plan to improve water quality in Ohio, starting with preventing toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie.  The H2Ohio program will start in the Maumee River watershed near Toledo but he wants to eventually broaden it to rest of the state.

Srdjan Randjelovic, Shutterstock.com

More than 13 Ohioans die each day due to opioid related causes, prompting lawmakers, city leaders and health officials to spend millions and take actions to prevent those deaths. But now a new report shows something else might be claiming lives in larger numbers than before. 

Valery Karpeev, Shutterstock.com

State lawmakers are looking at a proposal to eliminate sales taxes on college textbooks. Efforts to remove those taxes have not gone anywhere before but the lawmakers sponsoring it hope this time will be different.

Kelly Maynard (left) listens to a question at a press conference with Rep. Tim Ginter (R-Salem), Rep. Randi Clites (D-Ravenna) and Charlene York of the Ohio Rare Action Network. Clites' 17 year old son has hemophilia, which affects about 1,200 Ohioans.
Karen Kasler

There are more than 7,000 diseases that are considered “rare” – meaning that fewer than 200,000 people have them. But 10 percent of Americans have one of those “rare” diseases, including 1.1 million Ohioans.

One of the Ohio House’s top agenda items known as priority bills was passed in the Senate on Wednesday. But Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) said he’s still frustrated with the pace of legislation moving from his chamber through to the other one.

Women's Med Center of Dayton
Paige Pfleger, WOSU

The Ohio Department of Health has granted a license to Women’s Med Center of Dayton. It is the last abortion clinic in the Dayton area.

Iryna Imago, Shutterstock

Rep. Gary Scherer (R-Circleville) is proposing a bill, HB318, that would create an inspection and certification process for companies wanting to sell Kratom, an herbal supplement commonly found in powder and capsule form.

Rep. Stephanie Howse (at microphone)
Jo Ingles

Rep. Stephanie Howse (D-Cleveland) is one of five lawmakers from states that have or are considering abortion restrictions who are going to El Salvador to experience what life is like in a country that has an abortion ban. 

Jacob Lund, Shutterstock.com

Ohio law permits pharmacists to give the overdose drug Naloxone without a prescription to people who deal with opioid addicts. But one state lawmaker says many pharmacists are not doing that.

Rena Schild/SHUTTERSTOCK

A major piece of President Donald Trump's immigration policy is set for a showdown in the U.S. Supreme Court after the lower courts rejected the attempt to phase-out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA.

WWII vet Cecil Myers and his daughter, Linda Chaplin
Jo Ingles

Veterans around the state gathered today at events to honor their service. The National Veterans Memorial and Museum in Columbus, which offered free admissions to veterans and their families in honor of the occasion, paid its respects to those who have served their country.

House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) with Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina)
Andy Chow

Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) is throwing shots at the Ohio Senate, claiming they're taking too much time to pass bills that are priority issues in the House. Householder says his fellow Republicans in the Senate need to pick up the pace on issues that could help Ohioans.

Backers of abortion pill reversal bill
Jo Ingles

Two Democratic lawmakers are fighting back on bills now under consideration that would require doctors to provide patients with information mainstream medical groups consider inaccurate and not scientifically sound. 

Arina P. Habich, Shutterstock.com

Two Ohio lawmakers want to loosen state restrictions on alcohol. The bipartisan legislation they are proposing would make it easier for churches and non-profits to gift alcohol as part of fundraising events without having to obtain permits. 

Karen Kasler

Advocates are worried about the process that will eventually require thousands of Ohioans in Medicaid expansion to work 20 hours a week or lose their benefits, which the state got permission to impose earlier this year.

Dzelat, Shutterstock.com

Ohio lawmakers are proposing a new bill to crack down on human trafficking by going after the people who fund the practice – those who recruit and force people into prostitution and those who pay for it. 

Dan Konik

In Ohio, as many as 19,000 children are projected to be in the foster care system by this time next year. State leaders are offering a plan that could address the crisis by alleviating some of the financial stress that comes with adoption through reduced interest rates.

The Columbus Crossroads project, still under construction in downtown Columbus, will result in a redesigned “split” for I-70 and I-71. ODOT designated the $1.3 billion multi-phase project as a priority for TRAC funding in 2011.
Karen Kasler

For the first time in several years, an Ohio Department of Transportation panel has voted to move forward on hundreds of millions of dollars in road construction projects.

Mike Rogal, Shutterstock.com

The Ohio Senate has passed and sent two controversial abortion bills to the Ohio House. One involves abortion reversal, a practice that is not backed by mainstream medical professionals. That other subjects doctors to steep penalties for failing to deal with aborted remains in a particular way. 

Gov. DeWine signs the bill into law
Dan Konik

Gov. Mike DeWine has signed into law a bill that strengthens rules for amusement rides in Ohio. 

Andy Chow

Republican lawmakers in the Ohio House and Senate are pushing for a bill that would allow township voters to reject wind farm projects through a referendum.

Sen. Matt Dolan (R-Chagrin Falls) testifies for S.B. 221, the so-called "STRONG Ohio" gun violence plan.
Karen Kasler

Democratic state senators had lots of questions for the sponsor of Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed gun violence bill at its first hearing.

On this election day, two Democratic state lawmakers announced they’re introducing a bill to make future general election days paid state holidays for all Ohio workers.

Fizkes, Shutterstock.com

An Ohio Senate committee has paved the way for the two controversial bills to hit the chamber floor tomorrow. Both would put restrictions on doctors performing those procedures. 

Gov. DeWine signs executive order on foster care
Dan Konik

Gov. Mike DeWine has signed an executive order that establishes an advisory council that will come up with suggestions for how to make it work better for foster families. 

Proxima Studio, Shutterstock.com

Disabled Ohioans are limited on how much they can earn or save and still be eligible for Social Security or Medicaid. But special savings accounts through Ohio’s Treasurer office that will allow them to save without losing benefits are gaining in popularity.

Sen. Matt Huffman explains his bill to reporters
Jo Ingles

A federal program that could provide $5 billion dollars to private schools across the country hasn’t received the ok from congress yet. But that’s not stopping at least one state senator from introducing a bill to draw down those dollars when and if the program is approved.

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