hate groups

Henry Locke (right, in red mask holding bullhorn) and other members of the Ohio Boogaloo spoke to reporters and those assembled for the event.
Karen Kasler

The "armed march" that was expected in all 50 state capitals and brought out heavy security resulted in just a few dozen protestors in Columbus Sunday.

Some demonstrators at an anti-mask rally at the Statehouse in July. Event planners said security would be provided by "militia". Proud Boys are often identified by black collared polo shirts with yellow stripes on the sleeves.
Karen Kasler

Federal authorities have charged more than a dozen men with plotting to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and overthrow the government. And the feds say that group did some of its planning this summer in Ohio, where extremist groups have been active since at least 1994.

CaseJustin, Shutterstock.com

A leading organization representing Jewish Americans says the mass shooting at a Pittsburgh area synagogue over the weekend has left Ohioans who practice the faith in state of shock. It has prompted synagogues to step up safety.

There is a fear nationwide that the same kind of hate march that happened in Charlottesville could happen again, even in Ohio. A variety of community groups gathered in Columbus to talk about hate and how to respond in its wake.

The State of Ohio

Democrats in the state Legislature are supporting a new bill that would officially denounce white nationalists and neo-Nazis. 

Andy Chow

Gov. John Kasich has turned up the heat on President Donald Trump in the aftermath of Trump’s shaky position on white nationalists, neo-Nazis, the KKK and other hate groups. This marks another turn in the evolution of Kasich’s relationship with the Trump Administration.