Lori Criss

Ohio Department of Mental Health and Drug Addiction Services Director Lori Criss, speaking about her selection by Gov. Mike DeWine (right) to lead that agency in January 2019.
Andy Chow

As the coronavirus continues to spread widely and rapidly through Ohio, the head of the state’s mental health and drug addiction agency has tested positive for COVID-19.

Dr. Kenneth Yeager talks to Jo Ingles
Dan Konik

Millions of Ohioans are staying home as ordered, as schools have closed, employers have ordered them to work remotely and entertainment options have been shut down. And hundreds of thousands have lost their jobs as businesses shuttered – perhaps temporarily or maybe permanently. All of these sudden changes are having an impact on Ohioans who are now living very different lives than just a few weeks ago.

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Ohio Medicaid says it will continue to enforce a new rule requiring background checks of Medicaid providers. Some of them say the new practice will cost some good providers their jobs and will worsen tight staffing situations. 

On Sunday, the state will officially move providers of behavioral health services for low-income Ohioans into Medicaid managed care. That’s a huge change for how they get paid for providing addiction and mental illness treatment, family counseling and other services. And these last few days are causing lots of worry for some of those providers.

theohiocouncil.org

The state is moving mental health and addiction services for low income Ohioans into Medicaid managed care by July 1, and it’s the biggest and most complicated change the behavioral health system in Ohio has ever seen. But a survey of more than a hundred of those providers shows the redesign is straining their finances and could shut them down.

Karen Kasler

It’ll be a while before the state puts out new official numbers on Ohio’s deadly opioid crisis. But the federal Centers for Disease Control says it has new stats that show the epidemic is nowhere close to slowing down.

Dan Konik

Drug addiction councilors are speaking out against a bill that would send an ex-convict to jail if they fail a drug test. They say this proposal uses the judicial system to solve a health care crisis. 

The state wants to change to the way mental health and addiction services are billed and coded, to align with national standards. But providers of those services, which are already stressed because of the opioid crisis, are very concerned.