Medicaid expansion

Karen Kasler

Advocates are worried about the process that will eventually require thousands of Ohioans in Medicaid expansion to work 20 hours a week or lose their benefits, which the state got permission to impose earlier this year.

Daniel Konik

A US District Court judge has thrown out Medicaid work requirements in two states, saying they are arbitrary and capricious.  Ohio is now reviewing its plan to impose work requirements on people in Medicaid expansion, which was just approved by the federal government two weeks ago.

Hundreds of people gathered at the Statehouse in April 2013 to show support for Medicaid expansion. Gov. John Kasich got it approved by the state Controlling Board later that year.
Karen Kasler

As of last Friday, the state has federal permission to require 20 hours of work per week for many non-disabled people on Medicaid expansion.  The state’s Medicaid director has put a number on how many people might be affected – and how much it might cost to put those requirements in place.

Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima) speaks at a press conference in 2017.
Karen Kasler

The federal government says Ohio can require non-disabled Medicaid expansion recipients to work 20 hours a week unless they’re caregiving, in job training or college or over 50. One state lawmaker is disappointed, because he wanted that age limit to be higher.

Now-Gov. Mike DeWine (center) speaks at an July 2018 event where he announced he'd keep Medicaid expansion, with work requirements.
Karen Kasler

The federal government says Ohio can join the eight other states that have been given permission to impose work requirements on people in Medicaid expansion.

Sen. Matt Huffman (R-Lima)
Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio is among 15 states that have asked the federal government for permission to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients. Ohio’s request would cover people up to age 50, but a state senator has proposed a bill that would go further.

Over the years, Kasich has brought forward a lot of ideas, and his tone has changed dramatically, as he’s worked to accomplish his goals and create a national persona as a Trump critic and a promoter of bipartisan compromise - with mixed results.

Kurhan, Shutterstock.com

UPDATED at 5:45 p.m. on Wednesday, December 26, 2018 A spokesman for the Ohio House says this is not one of the overrides lawmakers are still considering at this point.

Ohio lawmakers are scheduled to come back to the Statehouse tomorrow to possibly override some of Gov. John Kasich’s vetoes over the two-year session. One of those could affect 400,000 Ohioans in Medicaid expansion.

Karen Kasler

Some 750 doctors say they’re endorsing Democrat for governor Richard Cordray, breaking with the Ohio State Medical Association, which is backing his Republican opponent Mike DeWine. The doctors split over protections for people with pre-existing health conditions.

Karen Kasler

Gov. John Kasich continues to be concerned about the future of Medicaid expansion after he’s out of office in five months.  He's defending the program he pushed past skeptical state lawmakers in 2013 through a new study and through people who are in it.

Dan Konik

Democratic gubernatorial nominee Rich Cordray is doubling down on his support for Medicaid expansion and it’s economic viability. Cordray, along with the Kasich administration, says the program is sustainable and needs to remain consistent. 

Twitter

Republican candidate for governor Mike DeWine says he supports Medicaid expansion for all 700,000 Ohioans covered under it, but with work requirements. He says the program must be changed to be financially sustainable. But while those work requirements have strong support from Republican voters,  they might not have a huge effect on the overall cost of the program.

Andy Chow

An argument is brewing in the race to become Ohio’s next governor. Medicaid expansion has been a crucial topic in the campaign with both candidates, Mike DeWine and Rich Cordray, taking different approaches to the issue. One piece of the debate is over whether the expansion is sustainable. 

Karen Kasler

The debate over how the major party candidates for governor feel about Medicaid expansion has launched into an examination of exactly who are the 700,000 Ohioans in that expansion population – and who are not included.

Twitter

The Republican candidate for governor says he’s had a plan to keep Medicaid expansion for all 700,000 Ohioans covered under it. His Democratic opponent calls that a major about-face. And it shows there’s been a lot of confusion surrounding this key state policy, and what either candidate will do with Medicaid expansion if he is elected.

Karen Kasler

For the first time, the Republican candidate for governor is stating clearly that he would keep Medicaid expansion for all 700,000 Ohioans covered under it.  Mike DeWine says he’s been supportive all along, but his opponent says that’s not true.

Daniel Konik

The state has submitted its application to the federal government for permission to impose work requirements on 36,000 Ohio Medicaid recipients.

Jo Ingles

Gov. John Kasich signed the new two-year $2.6 billion capital budget today at the site of a planned mental and behavioral health hospital in Columbus. It’s one of the investments included in that spending plan. But Kasich issued a warning of sorts too.

Medicaid expansion is one of Republican Gov. John Kasich’s signature accomplishments, but it’s unlikely to remain if either his lieutenant governor or the attorney general is elected to replace him. And that would create a crisis for some 700,000 Ohioans in Medicaid expansion, most of whom are chronically ill or drug addicted.

Andy Chow

For the first time since lawmakers required it in the budget, Gov. John Kasich’s administration made a trip to the Statehouse to ask a panel of legislators to release hundreds of millions of dollars to fund Medicaid. 

Andy Chow

There are renewed fears that state lawmakers will freeze Medicaid expansion in Ohio now that latest attempt to overhaul the federal health care law went down. 

senate.gov

Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown says he’s very concerned about the latest Republican attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, which seems to have cautious support from his fellow Senator from Ohio, Republican Rob Portman. 

Karen Kasler

Republican leaders in the legislature are still looking at the possibility of freezing Medicaid expansion, a move the governor’s office says could result in a loss of health coverage for half a million people. 

Ohio’s U.S. Senators appear to be split on the latest attempt to repeal and replace the federal Affordable Care Act.  Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown has been against it, but now we know more about how the state’s Republican Sen. feels.

ohio.gov/colorado.gov

For months, Republican Gov. John Kasich has been talking about his work with Democratic Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper on health insurance reform. A proposal from the governors may be close, but it won’t touch one of the most expensive and controversial points of the federal health care law.

Karen Kasler

*Editor's note (8/15/17): The Senate has now announced the voting session will happen on August 22, and the session on August 23 has been cancelled.

Last month, state representatives voted to override a budget veto for the first time in 40 years. They actually overrode 11 of Gov. John Kasich’s 47 vetoes. Senators are now deciding which of those overrides to vote on, and that they may ask the House to consider overriding more vetoes.

Karen Kasler

Nine of the 11 vetoes that state representatives voted to override in the state budget this week are related to Medicaid, though not the big veto on the plan to freeze Medicaid expansion enrollment next year. That was likely no accident, because Medicaid was in the spotlight and under the microscope this time.

Karen Kasler

There may have been occasional disagreements between Ohio’s Republican-dominated House and Senate and Republican Gov. John Kasich, but he’d issued more than a hundred vetoes in his seven years in office without one being overturned. Today, that changed dramatically.

Dan Konik

Ohio’s Republican-dominated House and Senate went six years without even a serious threat of overriding a veto from Gov. John Kasich. Today the House overrode not one but 11 Kasich vetoes. 

Dan Konik

Hundreds of advocates gathered on the steps of the Statehouse to rally against a vote that would freeze Medicaid enrollment for certain people next year. This could be a last minute push as the House considers taking that up tomorrow.

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