Medical marijuana

Shidlovski, Shutterstock.com

Earlier this week, a State Medical Board of Ohio committee decided there wasn’t enough scientific proof that medical marijuana would help with anxiety and autism spectrum disorder. That reversed a recommendation made earlier this summer that the drug be added to the list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana use in Ohio. But the board's change isn’t sitting well with parents who had hoped to be able to transition their autistic children off prescription drugs to marijuana. 

Medical marijuana
Jo Ingles

Right now, there are 21 medical conditions for which Ohioans could get medical marijuana. But that list could be growing.

Line forms outside Columbus Terrasona dispensary
Jo Ingles

A dozen medical marijuana dispensaries have been given certificates of operation. Dispensaries in Northeast and Eastern Ohio have been open for a few weeks. But there haven’t been any in central Ohio….until earlier today.

The Botanist, a dispensary in Canton
Adrian Ma / Ideastream

Medical marijuana sales in Ohio continue to increase, even if the product is still available on a very limited basis. 

Teri Verbickis, Shutterstock.com

More than 5,400 Ohioans have purchased cannabis since sales began at dispensaries in mid-January. 

The Botanist, a medical marijuana dispensary in Canton
WKSU

It’s been more than a month now since medical marijuana was available for sale in limited parts of Ohio and the sales continue to climb.

Teri Verbickis, Shutterstock.com

There are now six medical marijuana dispensaries open in Ohio, with the latest one in East Liverpool opening last week. And the sales at those facilities continue to be brisk. 

The Botanist in Wickliffe is the fifth medical marijuana dispensary to open in Ohio. It started operations on Wednesday.
Adrian Ma, WCPN

As a fifth dispensary begins operations and a sixth will soon open, the state is starting to learn more about the patients who are seeking medical marijuana to treat any of 21 qualifying conditions.

Sherry Yates Young, Shutterstock.com

There are only four medical marijuana dispensaries open in Ohio at this point but in the last two weeks, they’ve sold more than a half million dollars worth of product.

Teri Verbickis, Shutterstock.com

Ohio law says medical marijuana can be used to treat specific conditions in children. But what happens when those kids need to take a dose of it while they are attending school? The answer is unclear.

Teri Verbickis, Shutterstock.com

Four medical marijuana dispensaries opened yesterday to sell the first products to Ohioans. Here's how business went on the first day.

Medical marijuana sales opened at the Botanist in Canton on Wednesday.
Tim Rudell, WKSU

Ohioans who have been waiting to get medical marijuana in Ohio don't have to wait any longer.  

Statehouse News Bureau

Four more medical marijuana dispensaries have been awarded licenses from the state. And these businesses are now close to opening their doors.

Statehouse News Bureau

The first of 56 medical marijuana dispensaries could open in a few days in Eastern Ohio. 

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Commission logo

Thousands of Ohioans have already received the paperwork they need to access medical marijuana and are ready to get it when it becomes available. 

Statehouse News Bureau

After months of delays, patients could be able to get legal medical marijuana in Ohio in a matter of days. 

Shutterstock.com

None of the 56 medical marijuana dispensaries planned for under the state’s new Medical Marijuana Program are operating yet. But that’s not stopping some doctors from writing recommendations for patients who can ultimately use the drug when it does become available.

Ohio Auditor
Statehouse News Bureau

State Auditor Dave Yost says he’s found dozens of problems with Ohio’s Medical Marijuana Program, and he’s questioning the legality of one of the actions it took. 

Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio’s medical marijuana program went into effect on September 8, 2016 yet two years later, the drug hasn’t been dispensed to anyone. It was supposed to be fully operational on September 8th of this year but that’s not happening. Here's why.

Columbus, Ohio
Jo Ingles

Products derived from marijuana that don’t contain THC, the chemical that produces a “high”, are being sold in stores throughout the state. Cannabinoid or CBD oil can be found in boutique shops and health food stores. But the state’s Pharmacy Board says sales of those products are illegal.

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Commission logo

More processing and testing facilities for Ohio’s Medical Marijuana program have been given provisional permits to proceed with their plans. 

pharmacy.ohio.gov/

There have been court challenges by rejected applicants, inspections issues and other problems in putting the state’s medical marijuana program into effect. And now there’s yet another delay in the program, which was supposed to be up and running in less than two months.

For the first time, a company has been given the go-ahead to start growing marijuana in Ohio. The group just received an official cultivator license from the state. Now more than a dozen other companies are lined up for inspections. The state’s medical marijuana program is still behind schedule.

There was bad news for some of those challenging the process behind the state’s medical marijuana program, but that’s good news for its future. 

Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio’s medical marijuana program is supposed to be fully operational on September 8. But there are court battles over problems with the process of choosing cultivators. Some fear it might delay the start of the program. 

Jo Ingles

Officials with Ohio’s medical marijuana program say it won’t be fully in operation by September 8, two years from the date the law creating the program was signed. 

Karen Kasler

Advocates are pushing for the state program that would regulate medical marijuana to be ready to go as scheduled this fall, even though there are lawsuits and concerns over how the companies that won licenses to grow medical pot were selected.

Jo Ingles

Ohio lawmakers are now weighing in with a proposed fix for problems with the process being used by the state commerce department in the medical marijuana program. 

Jo Ingles

Ohio’s Auditor says it’s probably too late for the state Department of Commerce to pause its medical marijuana processes to fix problems with them. And he’s telling the department to now focus on defending lawsuits.

Statehouse News Bureau

The agency that oversees the state’s medical marijuana program admits there are problems with the scoring process used to grant medical marijuana growing licenses. 

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