Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program

Chris Stock
Statehouse News Bureau

The appointment comes after House Speaker Larry Householder fired Bob Bridges from that post last week. But Householder's newly picked patient advocate has ties to the business side of the issue. 

Patients line up at Columbus area dispensary
Jo Ingles

An advocate for patients in Ohio’s Medical Marijuana Program says he thinks more needs to be done to better serve patients. And he thinks he’s being retaliated against for speaking out about those concerns.

Shidlovski, Shutterstock.com

Earlier this week, a State Medical Board of Ohio committee decided there wasn’t enough scientific proof that medical marijuana would help with anxiety and autism spectrum disorder. That reversed a recommendation made earlier this summer that the drug be added to the list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana use in Ohio. But the board's change isn’t sitting well with parents who had hoped to be able to transition their autistic children off prescription drugs to marijuana. 

The Botanist, a dispensary in Canton
Adrian Ma / Ideastream

Medical marijuana sales in Ohio continue to increase, even if the product is still available on a very limited basis. 

The Botanist, a medical marijuana dispensary in Canton
WKSU

It’s been more than a month now since medical marijuana was available for sale in limited parts of Ohio and the sales continue to climb.

Lenetstan, Shutterstock.com

Four medical marijuana dispensaries are now open in Ohio and more are planned to come online in the future. And the number of conditions for which marijuana can be used in Ohio could expand too.

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Commission logo

Thousands of Ohioans have already received the paperwork they need to access medical marijuana and are ready to get it when it becomes available. 

Statehouse News Bureau

After months of delays, patients could be able to get legal medical marijuana in Ohio in a matter of days. 

Shutterstock.com

None of the 56 medical marijuana dispensaries planned for under the state’s new Medical Marijuana Program are operating yet. But that’s not stopping some doctors from writing recommendations for patients who can ultimately use the drug when it does become available.