SNAP

ODJFS

Advocates for low-income Ohioans say they’re concerned about yet another change proposed at the federal level for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, known as SNAP or food stamps.

There's a line outside the All People's Fresh Market when it opens at 11am.
Karen Kasler

The numbers of low-income Ohioans turning to food pantries for help are climbing. And with signs of trouble for the economy on the horizon, advocates at Ohio's 12 regional foodbanks and the hundreds of food pantries and soup kitchens that they serve are worried.

Lisa Hamler-Fugitt, executive director of the Ohio Association of Food Banks (right), checks out the produce while she talks with employees at the Mid-Ohio Food Bank in Grove City, just south of Columbus.
Karen Kasler

Advocates say three million Americans in 40 states could lose their SNAP or food stamp benefits because of a federal rule change in how eligibility is determined at the state level.

Adam Melnyk, Shutterstock.com

The Trump administration wants to cut food stamp benefits for about three million Americans. 

Ohio Department of Job and Family Services
Dan Konik

Last month, Ohio issued food stamp benefits for February to low income Ohioans. The idea was to get needy families the assistance up front so they wouldn’t go hungry due to the federal government shutdown. But now, families are finding it hard to stretch those dollars into March. So the state is making another adjustment.

Jonathan Weiss/Shutterstock

Advocates for lower income people say 1.5 million Ohioans are approaching a food crisis because of the federal government shutdown

Jonathan Weiss/Shutterstock

Ohioans who depend on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program have been issued checks for February to ensure they don’t go without food during the partial federal shutdown. But some needy Ohioans mistakenly think they have to use those benefits now.

Ohio Association of Foodbanks
Statehouse News Bureau

Under President Trump’s newly proposed budget, about 80% of SNAP recipients could lose about half of the credit that is currently put on their EBT cards, and would receive a box of food from the government instead. The director of the organization that represents the state’s food banks says it would destroy the safety net for low-income Ohioans and punish them instead.

Jo Ingles

State Auditor Dave Yost has shared his recent limited audit of the federal food stamp program in Ohio with a congressional committee.

Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio Auditor Dave Yost is going to Congress. He will take his concerns about a big federal program to a House committee this week.