"Stand Your Ground"

guns in a case at Columbus gun store
Dan Konik

Ohio’s new “Stand Your Ground” law goes into effect tomorrow (Tuesday 4-6-21) but already, a bill has been introduced at the Statehouse that would gut it. 

A rally opposing a so-called "Stand Your Ground" bill brought a few dozen people to the Statehouse in October 2013.
Statehouse News Bureau

The Republican lawmaker who proposed removing from state law the duty to retreat before using deadly force in a public place says he’s concerned about an armed march planned on the Statehouse this weekend.

People gather in Dayton to protest against the "Stand Your Ground" bill, 2019
Scott Cornell/Shutterstock

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) has signed the so-called "Stand Your Ground" bill, SB175, which removes the requirement for a person to retreat before shooting a person in self-defense. The move comes as DeWine has pushed for more gun regulations.

A rack of automatic handguns on display at a gun store in northwest Columbus.
Dan Konik

As state lawmakers return for a final week of their lame duck session, Gov. Mike DeWine is hinting he’ll veto a controversial gun bill they sent to him last week. And if he does reject the so-called Stand Your Ground bill, they may not be able to do anything about it.

People gather in Dayton to protest against the "Stand Your Ground" bill, 2019
Scott Cornell/Shutterstock

The controversial gun law that removes the "duty to retreat" requirement before a person can use lethal force in self-defense was passed by the Ohio House. The debate over the so-called "Stand Your Ground" law happened late into the night Thursday.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley and ballot issue supporters
Karen Kasler

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley wants lawmakers to shelve a bill that would remove restrictions for using lethal force in self-defense. The so-called "Stand Your Ground" bill, SB383, is moving its way through the legislature with the chance of passing before the month.

Dan Konik

A coalition of eight groups advocating for more gun control is starting an online petition campaign to stop efforts to pass the “Stand Your Ground” bill under consideration in the Ohio Legislature. 

Dan Konik

For most of 2019, a lot of talk about guns focused on bills that would lift restrictions until the deadly mass shooting in Dayton turned the tables.

Senate Minority Leader Kenny Yuko (D-Richmond Heights, left) and Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) talked about 2019 on "The State of Ohio".
Karen Kasler

Gov. Mike DeWine says one of his top priorities in 2020 will be to push the package of gun and mental health law changes that he put forward after the mass shooting in Dayton in August. But the leaders of the Ohio Senate are suggesting that might be an uphill battle.

Statehouse News Bureau

Lawmakers are preparing to hold more hearings on a bill that makes it easier to use lethal force as self-defense in a threatening situation, but Gov. Mike DeWine is calling on the legislature to prioritize another bill before "Stand Your Ground."

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would remove what's known as the "duty to retreat" in public before shooting someone in self-defense, a law commonly referred to as the "Stand Your Ground" bill.

Gov. Mike DeWine unveiled his STRONG Ohio plan in front of law enforcement, mental health professionals and state officials in October.
Daniel Konik

A quarter of the Ohio House – all Republicans – have signed on to a new “stand your ground” self-defense bill introduced last week.

An AR-15, one of the weapons Ohio Gun Owners says would be banned if the law takes effect as written.
WikiMedia Commons

A gun owners’ group is taking aim at a self-defense law passed in the lame duck session last year – saying it could make felons out of half a million Ohioans who own certain weapons.

Andy Chow

Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) said he's open to discussing two high-profile gun laws when the General Assembly returns next year, the "Stand Your Ground" bill and the "red flag law." These two issues caused a rift among members of the House and Senate, along with Gov. John Kasich.

Ohio House
Andy Chow

The Ohio House and Senate have voted to override Gov. John Kasich’s veto on, HB228, a bill that would revamp the way the state handles self-defense cases in court. 

Gov. John Kasich (left), Speaker Ryan Smith (R-Bidwell) and Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) all spoke at the unveiling of the permanent display of Ohio's two constitutions at the Statehouse in November. But they did not appear together.
Karen Kasler

As state lawmakers race toward the end of this lame duck legislative session, they’ve been considering two bills that Gov. John Kasich opposes – the six-week “Heartbeat Bill” abortion ban and the “Stand Your Ground” self-defense bill.  And if he vetoes them as promised, lawmakers would have to come back to vote on them again during the holiday break.

Karen Kasler

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) is disappointed with the legislation he’s seeing pushed through the Ohio General Assembly, such as efforts going into the “Stand Your Ground Bill” and “Heartbeat Bill,” and he says these polarizing issues end up reflecting poorly on the state.

Kiattipong/Shutterstock

The controversial legislation no longer includes an elimination of the "duty to retreat" for people who find themselves in threatening situations. Opponents argued that removing that language from Ohio code would make it for people to use lethal force in self-defense.

Senate Government Oversight and Reform holds hearing on HB228, the "Stand Your Ground" bill.
Andy Chow

Republican senators are planning to discuss the possible changes they would like to make to HB228, the so-called "Stand Your Ground" bill which might include more specific language on when to use lethal force in self-defense situations.

People gather in Dayton to protest against the "Stand Your Ground" bill, 2019
Scott Cornell/Shutterstock

The Senate Government Oversight and Reform Committee plans to pass the "Stand Your Ground" bill by the end of the week. The bill would make it easier for someone to use lethal force in self-defense by removing the duty to retreat in cases where a person feels threatened.

Daniel Konik

State lawmakers have overridden a quarter of Gov. John Kasich’s 48 vetoes. And they could do more in the next two weeks.  And Kasich has said he’d also veto the so-called "Stand Your Ground" self-defense bill and the six-week abortion ban called the Heartbeat Bill that recently passed the House.  Those vetoes and what lawmakers do about them could say something about the outgoing governor's relationship with his fellow Republicans in the legislature.

Karen Kasler

Two controversial bills that passed the Ohio House last week are on their way to the Senate. But Gov. John Kasich is once again saying they are likely to run into roadblocks if they make it to his desk.

Democrat, Cleveland
Dan Konik

The Ohio House has overwhelmingly (64-26) passed an NRA backed gun bill but not without controversy. There was intense debate on the House floor.

Karen Kasler

Gov. John Kasich is sounding off on the lack of movement on gun regulations that he’d proposed earlier this year, commenting on it in two separate public events.

Jo Ingles

The House will hold session tomorrow without voting on a controversial piece of legislation that makes it easier to use lethal force in self-defense. Opponents of the bill say the so-called “Stand Your Ground” bill was shelved because of strong public outcry. 

Dan Konik

The Ohio House is preparing to strip away more gun regulations making it easier to use lethal force in self-defense. This comes as the new House leader says Republican members aren’t close to approving new gun control measures. 

"Meet the Press Daily", MSNBC

The so-called “Stand Your Ground” bill is likely to come to the floor of the House next week, just before lawmakers leave for an extended break. And that might not be the end of the road for that controversial measure.

Konstantin Shadrin/shutterstock.com

One of the most controversial bills moving through the Statehouse is the so-called “Stand Your Ground” bill. Pro-gun groups are for the legislation and say it removes the requirement to try and retreat before taking lethal action. But there’s a separate battle happening within the bill.

Father of 17 year old killed in Parkland shooting
Jo Ingles

The Ohio Legislature is hearing testimony on dueling gun bills this week. 

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