Tim Ginter

Rep. Larry Householder (R-Glenford) is congratulated after his election as Speaker of the Ohio House in January 2019.
Andy Chow

With a vote set to remove House Speaker Larry Householder tomorrow morning and just two candidates in the race to replace him, there’s apparently a disagreement among Republicans on how that can happen.

Rep. Bob Cupp (R-Lima), as he left the caucus meeting where members decided to hold a floor vote on removing Larry Householder (R-Glenford) as House Speaker.
Karen Kasler

Republicans in the Ohio House will remove their leader in a floor vote on Thursday, after deciding to do so in a secret ballot Tuesday. But it’s unlikely that they’ll vote to expel Larry Householder, who’s facing a federal racketeering charge related to the nuclear bailout he pushed last year.

Newly elected Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) takes the oath of office in January 2019, after a months-long behind-the-scenes battle culminates in his ousting of Ryan Smith as the Republican leader of the Ohio House.
Andy Chow

Republican members of the Ohio House will meet Tuesday afternoon to discuss picking a new Speaker for the second time in a little over two years, as they consider what to do about current leader Larry Householder, who’s facing a racketeering charge related to the nuclear bailout law he pushed.

Palidachan, Shutterstock.com

Some Ohio lawmakers are backing a bill passed by the House that they say protects the religious rights of students. Opponents say it’s unnecessary and would hurt the academic integrity of schools.

Kelly Maynard (left) listens to a question at a press conference with Rep. Tim Ginter (R-Salem), Rep. Randi Clites (D-Ravenna) and Charlene York of the Ohio Rare Action Network. Clites' 17 year old son has hemophilia, which affects about 1,200 Ohioans.
Karen Kasler

There are more than 7,000 diseases that are considered “rare” – meaning that fewer than 200,000 people have them. But 10 percent of Americans have one of those “rare” diseases, including 1.1 million Ohioans.

Supporters of the "Heartbeat Bill" chanted outside the Ohio House chamber before the vote.
Karen Kasler

For the third time, a bill that bans abortion from the point a fetal heartbeat is detected has passed the Ohio House and Senate.  But this time will likely be the last for what's been called the "Heartbeat Bill", because Gov. Mike DeWine says he’ll sign it into law. 

Stu Nicholson, Columbus, Ohio

The Ohio House has passed a bill to help pets who need emergency medical care. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles explains.