transportation budget

Dan Konik

Members of the Ohio House and Senate reached a deal to raise the gas tax by 10.5 cents beginning in July. The lawmakers say that will be enough to help Ohio close a funding gap for construction on the state's roads and bridges. 

Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina, left) stands alongside Gov. Mike DeWine during DeWine's first State of the State speech in March. House Speaker Larry Householder (R-Glenford) is on DeWine's right.
Statehouse News Bureau

The deadline for a new state transportation budget with a gas tax hike came and went at midnight – without a new spending plan being signed. Lawmakers are coming back to the Statehouse this week hoping to work it out.

Traffic camera sign in Elmwood near Cincinnati
WVXU

There are sticking points in the debate over the transportation budget beyond how much to raise the gas tax. One of them is whether the state should impose new rules on communities using traffic cameras.

Sen. Kenny Yuko (D-Cleveland)
The State of Ohio, Ohio Public TV

It’s looking more unlikely that Ohio lawmakers will decide on the size of a proposed gas tax in time to meet the Sunday deadline to have the transportation budget signed into law. 

Dan Konik

The clock is ticking as Ohio lawmakers only have until Sunday to pass a transportation budget, but they’re jammed in a stalemate over the gas tax increase. 

Dan Konik, Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio lawmakers continue to work behind closed doors on hammering out an agreement over how much to increase Ohio’s gas tax. 

As lawmakers are working out differences in their transportation budgets, there’s one thing in the Senate’s version that doesn’t seem to have anything to do with transportation – a change in a tax credit designed for low-income people. But it’s being tied to the increase in the gas tax.

Gov. Mike DeWine (center) holds up a report on dangerous intersections. Joining him are ODOT Director Jack Marchbanks, Ohio State Highway Patrol Lt. Col. Kevin Teaford and Lt. Col. Marla Gaskill and Department of Public Safety Director Tom Stickrath.
Karen Kasler

Gov. Mike DeWine is trying a last ditch effort to push lawmakers back toward the gas tax increase that he originally proposed – which they slashed dramatically. 

Andy Chow

The Republican Senate president is saying the competing transportation budget proposals are closer than they appear as lawmakers go into the final week of negotiations before the deadline to pass a new budget.

Roschetzky Photography

The Ohio Senate has approved changes to the transportation budget, taking the originally-proposed gas tax hike from 18-cents a gallon to 6-cents a gallon. 

Sen. Bill Coley (R-Liberty Township) at a press conference in 2017
Karen Kasler

Senators have said they’re going to change the 10.7 cent gas tax increase that the House passed in the transportation budget. Gov. Mike DeWine says that’s too low, and the state needs an 18 cent hike. But one Republican senator has an idea that he says would eliminate the need for a tax increase.

Andy Chow

Gov. Mike DeWine says he's trying to convey his message to lawmakers that the state is in dire need of more money for construction projects, and that his 18-cent gas tax increase proposal is the way to generate those funds. But the House cut that proposal down to 10.7 cents and Republican Senate leaders say more changes are coming.

Andy Chow

Republican Senate leaders released their version of the transportation budget bill, making dozens of changes to what the House passed in HB62, however the gas tax increase went untouched. Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon) says it's very likely that will change.

Dan Konik

Republican leaders in the Ohio Senate have hinted at some possible changes to the transportation budget plan that could spark a debate among the Senate, House, and governor's office.

Daniel Konik

Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed 18 cents gas tax increase was dropped to 10.7 cents by the House. Now the transportation budget is in the Senate, where it’s likely to get changed again.

Kabir Bhatia, WKSU

It’s been a few years, but state lawmakers are trying again to put rules on local traffic cameras, which they’ve said communities are using to generate revenue rather than improve safety. The new regulations are part of the same budget that would raise the state’s gas tax.

Scooter parked outside Ohio Statehouse
Statehouse News Bureau

Some cities throughout the state have put regulations in place for light weight electric scooters. Now state lawmakers are looking at doing the same thing statewide.

An RTA bus crosses the Detroit-Superior Bridge in downtown Cleveland in 2013.
Cleveland RTA/Facebook

Mass transit advocates in Ohio got a huge surprise in the House version of the transportation budget – funding for public transportation soared by 150% over Gov. Mike DeWine’s original proposal.  And they're hoping the Senate will go along with that too.

Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles

Ohioans would still have to have front license plates when driving, unlike drivers in Kentucky and Indiana. But a proposal in the state transportation budget would allow them to escape being cited if they’re parked.