mental health

Dr. Kenneth Yeager talks to Jo Ingles
Dan Konik

Millions of Ohioans are staying home as ordered, as schools have closed, employers have ordered them to work remotely and entertainment options have been shut down. And hundreds of thousands have lost their jobs as businesses shuttered – perhaps temporarily or maybe permanently. All of these sudden changes are having an impact on Ohioans who are now living very different lives than just a few weeks ago.

In October, Reps. D.J. Swearingen (R-Huron) and Phil Plummer (R-Dayton) talked about their bill.
Andy Chow

The leader of the Ohio House had pointed to that bill as an alternative to Gov. Mike DeWine’s anti-gun violence package – a proposal that is likely to be opposed by some Republicans.

Wesley Walker speaks about his experience with mental illness at a press conference featuring advocates for mental health and suicide prevention organizations.
Karen Kasler

Advocates are calling on Senators to restore $36 million in funding for mental health and suicide prevention before they pass the budget. That's money that was in the House budget but is not in the Senate version.

Karen Kasler

One of the leading figures in the state’s battle against the deadly opioid crisis is stepping down. The head of the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, who’s leaving six months before the end of the term of her boss, Gov. John Kasich.

Karen Kasler

The Republican candidate for governor has released what he says is a plan to invest in Ohio’s kids, families and future. But Democrats are saying his record shows he can’t be trusted on this.

theohiocouncil.org

The state is moving mental health and addiction services for low income Ohioans into Medicaid managed care by July 1, and it’s the biggest and most complicated change the behavioral health system in Ohio has ever seen. But a survey of more than a hundred of those providers shows the redesign is straining their finances and could shut them down.

Ron Corby

Ohio has more execution dates set than any other state. And a new report from Harvard Law School shows most of those condemned inmates have serious mental and intellectual impairments. And the group suggests that could pose a constitutional problem.

Jo Ingles

More than 15,000 Ohioans have texted a free crisis line when they have faced mental crisis within the past three years. The state and local behavioral health boards are hoping to make more people aware of that program.