Frank LaRose

Jo Ingles

On a party line vote, an Ohio House committee has passed a bill that will make some changes to election law. Backers say it gives more flexibility to election officials should COVID-19 cause changes this November but its opponents have concerns.

Secretary of State's zoom call with task force
Jo Ingles

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose has formed a task force with local and statewide elections officials to prepare for the November election. He’s pushing legislation that would make changes for November but Democrats have their own bill to do that.

Voter enters Franklin County Voting Center
Dan Konik

Just under a quarter of Ohio’s registered voters actually cast ballots in the primary election which ended earlier this week. Low turnout was expected after the original March 17th in person Election Day was canceled because of coronavirus concerns, and absentee voting by mail was extended until this past Tuesday. And there are now calls for change to make it easier to vote this fall.

Andy Chow

If you're still waiting on an absentee primary ballot to arrive in the mail, election officials say you're not alone. Secretary of State Frank LaRose says he's been fielding reports from around Ohio that the postal system is taking longer than usual to deliver the mail, including absentee ballots.

Secretary of State Frank LaRose at a morning press conference, along with Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton, Franklin County Board of Elections Director Ed Leonard and  Franklin County Public Health Commissioner Joe Mazzola.
Karen Kasler

Thousands of Ohio voters are finding out if they want to vote on election day, they’ll have to go to a new place to cast their ballots for the St. Patrick’s Day primary next week. The state is moving 128 polling places out of nursing homes and senior residential facilities because of concerns about spreading coronavirus to residents.

(NOTE: This story has been updated with a list of the new polling places.)

Michelle Wilcox, Ohio Assn. Of Election Officials
Jo Ingles

Voting rights advocates, computer security experts and some county elections officials gathered at the Ohio Statehouse for in a cybersecurity initiative. And some say they feel like they have the information they need to protect Ohio’s upcoming primary.

Secretary of State Frank LaRose speaks at an event outlining election security efforts his office has ordered.
Karen Kasler

The state’s chief elections officer is criticizing President Trump and other key figures for sharing rumors and false information related to voting, recently about the Iowa caucuses but going all the way back to the 2016 election. This comes as Ohioans prepare to start early voting in two weeks for the presidential primary in March.

Secretary of State Frank LaRose and board of elections officials at his press event: Deputy Director Shantiel Soeder of the Cuyahoga County BOE (right), Director Laura Bruns of the Miami County BOE and Director Michelle Wilcox of Auglaize County BOE.
Karen Kasler

90 percent of all Ohio counties are now considered compliant with an election security order issued by the Secretary of State last summer. That leaves a handful that aren’t, with two weeks until voters start casting early ballots for the March presidential primary.

Karen Kasler

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose is ordering county elections officials to be on guard for the possibility of a cyber attack from Iran after entities have seen an increase in suspicious cyber activity around the country.

Dan Konik

The state attorney general and several county prosecutors will be reviewing cases of potential voter fraud where people are accused of casting a vote in a different state then casting another in Ohio during the 2018 election.

Dan Konik

Ohio’s Secretary of State says 354 people who are not U.S. citizens registered to vote or actually cast ballots in 2018. And those people could potentially face charges. 

Shutterstock.com

Ohio’s Secretary of State says a recent attempt by a computer in Panama to insert code into his office’s website was unsuccessful. But state leaders say this incident underscores why a comprehensive election security plan must be put in place soon.

WWII vet Cecil Myers and his daughter, Linda Chaplin
Jo Ingles

Veterans around the state gathered today at events to honor their service. The National Veterans Memorial and Museum in Columbus, which offered free admissions to veterans and their families in honor of the occasion, paid its respects to those who have served their country.

Dan Konik

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose says 182,858 voter registrations were removed from rolls starting on Sept 6. Some community groups are working to get thousands of those voters to re-register.

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose
Jo Ingles

Ohio’s Secretary of State says he’ll release the list of registrations removed from voting rolls this month to various voter groups so they can re-register people on that list by the October 7 registration deadline.  And after he's dealt with that, he says he might check past voter removal lists for errors. 

Secretary of State Frank LaRose
Jo Ingles

An effort to circulate petitions to repeal the nuclear bailout law known as House Bill 6 has brought out a high-profile opposition campaign with ads and mailers.

Students first made their choices at the ExpressVote machines and then print out their paper ballots.
Karen Kasler

This is the time of year when students choose their school’s homecoming courts. And kids in one Franklin County high school are voting in a very official way.

Secretary of State Frank LaRose speaks during a demonstration of voting machines at Westland High School near Columbus.
Karen Kasler

The state is still counting up how many of 235,000 voter registrations identified as inactive were removed by county boards of elections starting September 6. But Secretary of State Frank LaRose said he wants to continue to work with voter rights groups who had concerns that active voters might also be removed.

Karen Kasler

Secretary of State Frank LaRose says state law requires voter roll maintenance, but voting rights groups say they’re still worried eligible voters will be "purged" by mistake.

Voters outside Franklin County Voting Center
Jo Ingles

A federal court has ruled Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose can remove more than 200,000 voters from the rolls Friday as planned. The Ohio Democratic Party had ask the court to block it, saying thousands of voters could be improperly removed. 

Ohio voters
Dan Konik

Before the ink is barely dry on a new settlement between the ACLU of Ohio and the Secretary of State's office, Ohio's Democratic Party is filing its own lawsuit over the process of removing voters from the rolls. 

Voters outside Franklin County Voting Center
Jo Ingles

Under this agreement between the ACLU of Ohio and Secretary of State Frank LaRose's office, those voters who have recently been removed from the rolls will be able to vote after all.

Niyazz, Shutterstock.com

Last week, voting rights activists said about 4,000 voters were wrongly on a list of 235,000 registrations provided by counties that were set to be removed or “purged” from the rolls next month. But Ohio’s top election official says that’s not true, and in fact more people are now active voters. Here's why those names aren’t being removed from the list.

Left to right – Tom Roberts (NAACP Ohio State Conference), Dylan Sellers (Fair Elections Center’s Campus Vote Project), Jen Miller (League of Women Voters of Ohio), Mike Brickner (All Vot
Jo Ingles

More than 235,000 Ohio voters are on a list to be removed from the voter rolls in a little over two weeks.

Dan Konik

Nearly two dozen groups and individuals are asking Ohio’s top elections official for a list of voters who could be dropped from the rolls this fall, so they can try to get them re-registered. 

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose
Jo Ingles

Ohio’s top elections official says it’s already easy to vote in Ohio but he says wants to make it even easier. Here's what he wants to do.

Karen Kasler

A project to reach out to 270,000 people deleted from the voting rolls only brought in a few hundred of them. And it also cost a lot more than expected.

Voters cast ballots at Franklin County's early vote center in Columbus in 2018.
Karen Kasler

Today is the first day of early voting for the May primary – which means yesterday was the last day to register to vote. And though turnout in off-year primaries is especially low, there may be those who will try to vote but find they’ve been removed from the rolls. 

Statehouse News Bureau

Ohio’s top elections official says it’s time for a change to the stickers that are handed out at early vote centers and at the polls on election day. And he wants people who in most cases can’t yet vote to play a role in designing them.

Karen Kasler

Ohio’s Secretary of State Frank LaRose is warning voters to be vigilant when they come across information regarding politics and government on social media, he says misinformation remains a top priority in the fight against elections meddling. 

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