2018 Issue 1

Andy Chow

Community organizers are rallying against the resolution that would make it harder for citizens to put an issue on the statewide ballot. They say the measure would deliver a huge blow to democracy. 

Statehouse News Bureau

This week lawmakers are returning for a lame duck session, with hearings set on a so-called right to work bill and a Republican-backed bill on free speech on college campuses.  Republican legislative leaders are talking about other priorities but suggesting action on controversial measures is possible.

Jo Ingles

Leaders of the Ohio Legislature say it’s time to look at changing the methods citizens groups are using to try to change the state’s constitution. 

Karen Kasler

The Republican leader of the Ohio Senate says while he and many others didn’t support Issue 1, the criminal sentencing and drug treatment reform plan that failed Tuesday. But he suggests there is a will to make the issue a top priority in the newly elected Senate next year. 

Statehouse News Bureau

For the third time in four years, Ohio voters soundly rejected a constitutional amendment that cost supporters millions to put on the ballot.  There is concern on both sides over the cost and the results of the vote on Issue 1.

Karen Kasler

The only issue on the statewide ballot in Ohio was trounced by a two-to-one margin. Voters rejected the constitutional amendment that would have lowered drug possession from a felony to a misdemeanor and would prioritize treatment for those offenders.

Xenia
Jo Ingles

An Ohio pastor who was speaking out in support of Issue 1, the state ballot issue that would provide drug users and possessors with treatment instead of jail time, says he’s changing his mind. 

Spaxiax/SHUTTERSTOCK.com

Voters in Ohio will see one statewide issue on the ballot. Supporters have said this constitutional amendment will steer non-violent drug offenders away from prison and into treatment. But opponents claim it will dismantle the work Ohio has already done to curb the opioid epidemic. 

GTS/Shutterstock.com

The state budget office is saying that if Issue 1 passes this fall, it will cost local communities more money for a variety of reasons. That’s a main reason why the issue, which is intended to divert money from incarceration into treatment in many cases, has drawn opposition from groups representing cities and counties. 

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The Ohio State Coroners Association has come out adamantly against the only issue on the statewide ballot, saying they can’t be for any measure that makes it more difficult to prosecute drug dealers and traffickers. 

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A conservative think tank is sending out a warning that Issue 1 could bring expensive, unintended consequences. But the group adds it’s unfortunate because the measure to steer drug users away from prison and towards treatment has merit. 

Steve Dettelbach for Attorney General campaign

A nominee for statewide office is breaking away from the top of the ticket when it comes to Issue 1. The constitutional amendment would reduce criminal sentences for non-violent drug offenders, and it’s becoming a major issue for several campaigns.

Jo Ingles

Gov. John Kasich says he’ll do what many of his fellow Republicans say they’ll do this fall when it comes to the statewide ballot issue that would change criminal sentencing to prefer treatment over prison time. 

Dan Konik

Rich Cordray and Mike DeWine are both making the only statewide issue on the fall ballot a major topic of their gubernatorial campaigns. This puts an even bigger spotlight on the measure that would scale down prison time for non-violent drug offenders. 

Andy Chow

A substance abuse survivor is fighting against the statewide ballot issue this fall that would reduce prison time for non-violent drug offenders. The former addict says, had this measure passed years ago, she would’ve faced a fate worse than jail time. 

Andy Chow

The only statewide issue on the fall ballot would reduce criminal sentencing for drug offenses. While Ohio’s chief justice believes Issue 1 would doom local drug courts, supporters are contradicting that. 

Supreme Court of Ohio

The top justice of the state’s highest court is speaking out on a constitutional amendment on the fall ballot, which would require low-level drug offenders be charged with misdemeanors, not felonies. Supporters say money could then go to treatment instead of crowded prisons. But Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor has concerns about Issue 1.

Daniel Konik

Secretary of State Jon Husted – who’s also the Republican candidate for lieutenant governor – has announced the official title for the only statewide issue that’s on the fall ballot.  Backers say the wording means they have work to do.

Karen Kasler

The panel that decides the wording of statewide ballot issues has agreed on the language for the only one voters will see this fall.  It’s a resolution to a dispute over Issue 1, which supporters say will prioritize treatment over prison for drug offenders, but opponents say will make communities more dangerous.

Statehouse News Bureau

Opponents are fighting back against a statewide ballot measure that would reduce the penalties for drug offenders. Under Issue 1, minor drug-related offenses would not require prison time, prioritizing treatment instead. Critics say that sets a dangerous precedent.

Statehouse News Bureau

Supporters of State Issue 1 say the proposed constitutional amendment will move Ohio in the right direction in fighting the opioid crisis. Backers of the ballot initiative say favoring treatment over prison time will save lives and money.